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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Thursday, March 6

Melasti Three Death sentences Si Yi Chen, Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen and Matthew Norman to life sentences


Sydney-man Matthew Norman along with two others; Thanh Duc Tan Nguyen and Si Yi Chen, are to have their death sentences reduced to life. Known as the Malasti Three following their arrest at a hotel of that name in 2005, the three later had their sentences increased by Indonesia's court system, despite an appeal. Australian Scott Rush, who is also on death row, is now in the final stages of preparing a review into his own case, with the ruling seen as a positive step for Rush's own appeal.
Rush had the same treatment during appeal, with the Indonesian courts actually increasing his sentence to death following the appeal. In his first televised interview this month, Rush said that he had little idea of the consequences because of his only minor travel experience. "I didn't know what I was risking, I didn't know there was a death penalty, I didn't know anything about Bali really," he said.
Mr Rush went on to say that he regretted the decision, and the problems it had caused to his family, adding that the thought of execution weighed daily.
"They had a lot of... expectance for me I guess, I mean I do feel bad... It weighs on my mind pretty much every second of the day," he said.
"I mean I can't have a normal conversation like I used to be able to because of this.
"It's always in my mind. Always in the back of my head or it stops sometimes at the front."
Three Australians convicted of heroin smuggling in Indonesia have had their death sentences reduced to life imprisonment, their lawyer said Thursday.Judges in Jakarta decided to spare the lives of three of the so-called "Bali Nine" gang of drug smugglers who tried to traffic heroin from the Indonesian resort island of Bali back to Australia in 2005."The Supreme Court made its ruling about four days ago and it commutes the death sentences for Si Yi Chen, Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen and Matthew Norman to life sentences," lawyer Erwin Siregar told AFP by telephone from Bali.The three, now aged between 21 and 24, were arrested in a hotel room in Bali with a small quantity of heroin shortly after others in the gang were arrested at the island's airport.The gang's three ring leaders, Scott Rush, Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, remain on death row, while the three other members are serving prison sentences ranging from life to 20 years.Australian Foreign Minister Stephen Smith said the government was trying to confirm the court's decision."If the reports are accuratethen of course it's very welcome," he told Nine Network television.Australian media said court documents and an interview with one of the judges revealed that the trio's previous good character, and their youth, had influenced the decision to drop the death sentences.Judge Hakim Nyak Pha said there had been "intense discussion" about what penalty was appropriate, Australia's Daily Telegraph reported. "They are not masterminds," the judge said.The three had expressed remorse and apologised to the court.Chen, Nguyen and Norman were known as the Melasti Three because they were arrested at the Melasti hotel in Bali.None of the three had drugs on them at the time, but police found 350 grammes of heroin in a suitcase in their room.Siregar, their lawyer, said he had been informally notified of the Supreme Court ruling and that he was seeking a copy of the official verdict.
The spokesman of the Indonesian Supreme Court could not be immediately reached for comments.

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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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