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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Monday, February 4

Vicente Corona, the alleged chief of a massive mail-order drug conspiracy

Vicente Corona, the alleged chief of a massive mail-order drug conspiracy that not only funneled a half-ton of marijuana and a quarter-ton of cocaine from California to Knoxville but also put on city streets some dangerous folks.
That the conspiracy itself is one of the largest busted here is without question.
The controversy that must be settled by jurors is whether this network was headed by Corona, painted in court records as a twice-convicted dope peddler, an illegal immigrant-turned millionaire with ties to the Mexican mafia and no hesitation to plot murder, or a mystery California gangster whose underlings are willing to lie Corona into a life sentence to protect him.
Two years ago, it seemed another mundane drug case, set apart only by its scope and delivery method.
First Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Winck had secured confessions from married couple Richard Robinson and Kimberly Robinson and their go-between, Dennis "Raggs" Richardson, identifying Corona as chief supplier of both marijuana and cocaine.
It represented that rare climb up the ladder from street hustler to mid-level dealer to regional supplier to top dog.
But attorney Steve Johnson soon mounted a defense that would twist this traditional plot into a veritable legal pretzel, with tales of gang loyalty and subterfuge, lying informants, missing dope and a corrupt California drug agent. At its heart, though, Johnson's defense is simple: Corona may have peddled a little pot, but no cocaine dealer was he.
In the federal system, it is a key distinction. The penalties for cocaine trafficking are far and above those for marijuana. Corona, if convicted of peddling both, faces a mandatory life sentence.
Court records filed in the pre-trial battles that have been waging now between prosecution partners Winck and Assistant U.S. Attorney Trey Hamilton and defense attorneys Johnson and Wade Davies offer tantalizing glimpses at the story soon to unfold in a trial to be presided over by U.S. District Judge Thomas W. Phillips.
Winck and Hamilton, for instance, have filed a motion that paints Corona as downright villainous.
It links him to the Mexican Mafia and details a variety of plots he allegedly hatched since his January 2006 arrest in the San Fernando Valley.
"Corona stated he planned to escape (from jail) during a medical procedure," one document stated. "(In a second escape plot), the United States will offer testimony that Corona stated that he planned to escape … by having his associates kill his guards during his return from a court appearance."
The document accuses Corona of trying to track down not only witnesses against him but their family members, with plans to kidnap or even kill them to silence those witnesses, as well as planning a revenge killing of a co-hort cooperating with authorities.
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration notes filed as part of one legal battle show shades of "Scarface," with Corona boasting of being a millionaire with a mansion fit for a drug kingpin.
Defense records tell an altogether different tale, painting Corona as a victim of the scheming Robinsons and Richardson, all of whom Johnson alleges are members of a dangerous Los Angeles gang known as the Original Valley Gang, a small sect of the Crips street gang.
The defense accuses the Robinsons of crafting a plot to frame Corona "in order to protect their true supplier within the OVG while at the same time get the benefit of cooperation with the government in order to obtain relief from severe mandatory minimum sentences.
"… Mr. Robinson is one of the original members of the Original Valley Gang, that he is a high-ranking or senior member of the gang (and) has a duty to lie for and protect the members of the gang, and other gang members such as other government witnesses (including Richardson) have a duty to protect him and do what he tells them to do," Johnson wrote.
Johnson and Davies also are trying to draw into the case testimony about a California drug agent recently indicted in that state for allegedly robbing drug dealers. That agent was one of several present when Corona was nabbed. According to court records, Corona had marijuana in his possession at the time, but that drug has since turned up missing.
Winck and Hamilton contend the agent's legal woes have nothing to do with the case against Corona. They're also trying to convince Phillips to shoot down Johnson's bid to bring into Knoxville a California geography professor who claims to be a street gang expert.

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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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