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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Friday, February 8

Vancouvers drug capital of Canada starts CONAIR


The Vancouver Board of Trade is urging residents to donate frequent- flier miles so that people who are accused of crimes outside British Columbia can be returned to those provinces.
Vancouver has about 2,500 fugitives who are wanted on low- priority arrest warrants for crimes ranging from fraud to assault that were committed in other regions, police say. The suspects' jurisdictions aren't willing to spend the estimated C$2,500 ($2,480) it would take to fly them back.
``We're sending a message that fleeing to Vancouver is no longer a low-risk endeavor,'' said Bernie Magnan, an assistant managing director of the Vancouver Board of Trade who is responsible for the ``Con Air'' Appeal.
Vancouver is a magnet for suspects on the run because winters are mild in Canada's third-most-populous metropolitan area and it is a hub of drug abuse, said Mariana Valverde, a professor of criminology at the University of Toronto.
``Vancouver is the drug capital of Canada,'' she said, with the city's Downtown Eastside district known for illicit drug use, prostitution and violence.
Vancouver Police support the project and are eager to get more people to justice, said Constable Tim Fanning, a spokesman.
A better solution would be to speed up the court process and bring more suspects to trial, Valverde said. She predicted that businesses will pressure the city to clean up the Downtown Eastside before the Winter Olympics in 2010.
The Board of Trade kicked off the appeal for donations from the public last month by pledging more than 1 million of its directors' own reward miles.
So far, no point-paid flights have got off the ground. Airline miles programs aren't endorsing the campaign nor agreeing to cash in points to move fugitives.
``It's a novel concept, but it's really a public policy issue that needs to be resolved by provincial and federal governments, as well as local authorities,'' said Mitchell Merowitz, a spokesman for Toronto-based Air Miles, a loyalty rewards program used by about 9 million Canadian households.
Michele Meier, a spokeswoman for Air Canada's Aeroplan program, said she doubts that the Vancouver appeal for points would qualify under the airline's policy on points donations.
``Sending back suspects is not a charitable cause,'' she said. Montreal-based Air Canada is the country's biggest airline.

Magnan said the group is in talks with several loyalty programs that are considering accepting donated miles to fly suspects home.
``The wheels of progress can turn slowly,'' he said.

Ultimately, Vancouver hopes to spearhead a cross-country suspect-exchange system that might charter entire planes, Fanning said. For now, police would be happy to defray the cost of flying a suspect to another province by returning with someone wanted for crimes in Vancouver, he said.
``What we're trying to do is bring people to justice whether they end up staying here or going back to where they came from,'' Fanning said. ``It's about victims having their day in court.''

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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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