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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Monday, February 18

Sugar Shack, Daryl Shack,A neighborhood will only have as much crime as they'll tolerate.

"A neighborhood will only have as much crime as they'll tolerate," Hartley,the narcotics assistant chief said. police said that after 20 years of slinging drugs, Shack was a careful man. He tossed his cell phone every few weeks. He had dogs and a surveillance system hooked up at the house he stayed in between Shannon Ridge and the church. Investigators said he used different units at Shannon Ridge, where he was on the books as a maintenance man, to cook drugs often sold in the complex's laundry room as lookouts circled on bicycles. Police said the 41-year-old kept a handful of close operatives and a slightly larger network of addicts who sold crack on the streets. Investigators believe the addicts got a dose of free crack in the morning to get them up and out like someone else's cup of coffee. At day's end, the big sellers got another freebie, according to police. By that time, the ring had moved about $1,000 of crack within a neighborhood less than a mile wide, detectives said.
To trap Shack, police had a tailor-made plan. Two undercover detectives posed as construction crew leaders who made crack buys to pay their own laborers the way authorities said Shack did - with $25 doses of the off-white rocks of poison.
"We started off buying one piece at a time," Narcotics Assistant Chief John Hartley said of the 30 crack deals the detectives began in November. "Ultimately the goal was to get to Shack. But that took a long time." On Friday, Shack's court-appointed attorney, David Makofka, spoke from the hallway outside Courtroom 5D at the federal courthouse in Jacksonville. It was minutes after his client pleaded not guilty in his drug case. "Don't crucify him until you hear the facts," the lawyer said, becoming the first to defend Shack publicly since the man's Feb. 5 arrest in a police raid. On Feb. 6 a federal grand jury indicted Shack on 14 drug counts, including conspiracy to distribute more than 50 grams of cocaine base. Makofka said his client also denies any part in arson or human slavery offenses.
"When they don't have anything to talk about in the case, they talk about window dressing," Makofka said of law-enforcement agents. "The community needs to put the brakes on all these discussions and give him his day in court."
Shack has had those before. In 1999 a federal jury acquitted him on drug charges after law-enforcement agents nabbed Shack in connection with a 4-kilogram, or about $90,000 cocaine shipment in Fort Lauderdale.
Both his co-defendants went to prison. But with two prior state convictions involving felony drug charges, Shack is facing a maximum penalty of life in prison plus 390 years and a $34 million fine. Among the evidence police seized in the case was a soup mug they said he used to zap cocaine into crack cookies in the Magic Chef microwave in his Shannon Avenue house. Among the property they seized was his 2008 Ford F-250 truck, a gold ring, two diamond stud earrings and a gold Jesus pendant on a thick gold chain worth an estimated $3,000. It's not clear if authorities will seize the deed to the $380,000 home off Kernan Boulevard records show he bought in 2006 with his second wife. They are now divorced. Shack told the judge he made about $4,000 a month as a legitimate maintenance man before he went to federal lockup in Georgia. But the man's history of local arrest and booking reports dating back to 1987 alludes to a violent criminal past. In 2005, police investigated allegations Shack ordered one of his operatives to beat to death another addict who worked for him. That case never made it to court, even after officers recovered a radiator used in the attack. But police said both the victim and the accused from that case now are among Shack's five co-defendants in the federal drug indictment.
Police arrested 18 people they've linked to drug dealing in the Shannon Ridge area after three recent raids following the investigation they dubbed "Operation Sugar Cane."
The name was a nod to one of Shack's nicknames: Sugar Shack.
It also was the name of a limo service he had in the late 1980s.
Hartley, the narcotics assistant chief, said police plan to keep a presence in Biltmore even after they scoop up the four drug-dealing suspects they're still looking for.
"Our message to people that live there is we will not let this happen again. We don't want another Daryl Shack," he said.
The pastor also has vowed to make sure that doesn't happen. Detectives have promised him justice for the arson as that investigation continues.
But Biltmore's future mostly is up to its residents, according to the assistant chief.

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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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