Translate

Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Subscribe via email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

Over 3000 drug related posts search here

Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

Subscriptions

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Comments:This is your opportunity to speak out about the story you just read. We encourage all readers to participate in this forum.Please follow our guidelines and do not post:Potentially libelous statements or damaging innuendo, such as accusing somebody of a crime, defaming someone's character, or making statements that can harm somebody's reputation.Obscene, explicit, or racist language.Personal attacks, insults, threats, harassment, or posting comments that incite violence.Comments using another person's real name to disguise your identity.Commercial product promotions.Comments unrelated to the story.Links to other Web sites.While we do not edit comments, we do reserve the right to remove comments that violate our code of conduct.If you feel someone has violated our posting guidelines please contact us immediately so we can remove the post. We appreciate your help in regulating our online community.
Drug Enforcement is pleased to provide a forum to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in newspapers and journals. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Readers Information

Reader uninitiated in blogs, the title of each post usually links to an original article from another source, be it newspaper or journal. Then text of the post consists of the posters comments and the comment button is for you to refer us to other interesting information or just to make a comment.
DISCLAIMER
Text may be subject to copyright.This blog does not claim copyright to any such text. Copyright remains with the original copyright holder
Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.
DISCLAIMER:Text may be subject to copyright.This blog does not claim copyright to any such text. Copyright remains with the original copyright holder


Click Above

Friday, September 21

FIONA APPLE ADMITTED Drugs Were Hers ... Cops Say

0920_fiona_apple_03
Fiona Apple "freely admitted" the hash and the weed on her tour bus belonged to her when cops discovered the drugs last night ... so says the Hudspeth County Sheriff's Office. 

Cops say .... Apple's 2004 tour bus entered the U.S. Border Patrol Checkpoint in Sierra Blanca, TX around 8 PM on Sept. 19 and officers performed a "routine" check of the vehicle. 

During the sweep, officers used drug-sniffing dogs ... which detected the presence of narcotics in a blue backpack. 

Cops say the backpack contained a glass container with .01 pounds of weed and .01 pounds of hash. 

For all of you squares law-abiders unfamiliar with drug weight -- the weed is equivalent to the size of a baseball ... and the hash is equivalent to the size of a golf ball. 

Cops say Apple "freely admitted" the drugs were hers and she was placed under arrest. 

According to police, Apple spent the night in jail -- and was released earlier today on $10,000 bond.



Read more...

Monday, September 17

DOCTOR watched his wife lose consciousness and struggle for breath moments after injecting her with heroin, a court has heard.

Ashley Sibery, 39, persuaded his wife, Sital, to take the class-A drug minutes after she confronted him about his secret drug habit. Mrs Sibery had decided to confront her husband because of his erratic behaviour, Edinburgh Sheriff Court was told yesterday. The general practitioner admitted to Mrs Sibery that he had been using the lethal narcotic for two months. She told him that if he did not quit his addiction then she would end their marriage. However, despite this ultimatum, Sibery managed to persuade her into taking what was supposed to be his final fix. The court was told that Sibery had wanted his wife to experience the feeling that he got when he took the drug. But after the injection, Mrs Sibery collapsed and started having difficulties breathing. The paramedics who attended their home recognised Sibery as a former accident and emergency doctor and managed to save his wife’s life. Sibery was then arrested and confessed to police his involvement in the potentially lethal incident. The story emerged following a hearing in which Sibery, of London Street, Edinburgh, pleaded guilty to a charge of culpable and reckless conduct before Sheriff Elizabeth Jarvie, QC. Depute procurator-fiscal Karen Rollo told the court that the incident took place on 2 April, 2012, at the couple’s home in London Street. The court heard that before the incident, Sibery worked in the city as a GP. He qualified as a doctor in 2002 and had once worked in accident and emergency medicine. Ms Rollo told Sheriff Jarvie that the pair had an argument about how Sibery had been behaving in the months leading up to April. Mrs Sibery was concerned about how her partner had been acting. She added: “He had admitted to her that he had spent the last two months injecting heroin into himself. “She issued him with an ultimatum. She told him that he had to stop taking the drugs or their marriage would be over. “Bizarrely, he asked her if she wanted to try some. He told her that he had a small quantity of heroin remaining in the house and that he would give her it. He wanted her to experience the drug, to see what it was like. “The heroin was prepared and it was injected into her. Within a few minutes, she collapsed and lost consciousness. She started to have breathing difficulties. “An ambulance was then called to the house. The paramedics who attended the scene recognised him as being a doctor. They managed to keep her breathing and also stabilised her condition. She was then taken to hospital and received treatment.” Ms Rollo then told the court that police arrested Sibery and interviewed him at a police station in Edinburgh. The doctor confessed to them that he had given his wife heroin and that he had an addiction problem. Ms Rollo added: “The accused indicated that he had a heroin habit. He confessed to them that he had given his wife heroin. “He told them that he wanted to relax her and deal with stress. He told the officers how she slipped into unconsciousness.” The court heard that Sibery – who was on bail for the offence – was now in the care of a consultant psychiatrist, who was helping him deal with his problems. It is expected at that hearing that Sibery’s legal team will attempt to fully explain the reasons behind his behaviour.

Read more...

Anthrax infected drug user dies in Blackpool

A drug user has died in Blackpool after being infected with anthrax, health experts said. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) said a person who injected heroin died in hospital in the Lancashire town. It comes three weeks after another drug user, Declan Wallace, 48, from Kirkham, Lancashire, died in Blackpool after contracting the bacterial infection. The HPA said it believed he had injected contaminated heroin. There have been a spate of cases in Europe since early June, including one other fatal case in England, one non-fatal in Scotland and another in Wales. Breathing difficulties The HPA said it is "unclear" whether the British cases are linked to the European outbreak, which has affected drug users in Denmark, Germany and France. Anthrax is an acute bacterial infection most commonly found in hoofed animals such as cattle, sheep and goats. It normally infects humans when they inhale or ingest anthrax spores. Dr Fortune Ncube, an expert in blood-borne viruses at the HPA, said: "Anthrax can be cured with antibiotics, if treatment is started early. "It is therefore important for medical professionals to know the signs and symptoms to look for, so that there will be no delays in providing treatment. "It's likely that further cases among people who inject heroin will be identified as part of the ongoing outbreak in EU countries." He said an alert about the ongoing outbreak of anthrax among drug users has been circulated to NHS hospitals. Local drug services throughout the country have also been told, he said. Dr Ncube added: "The HPA is warning people who use heroin that they could be risking anthrax infection. "We urge all heroin users to seek urgent medical advice if they experience signs of infection such as redness or excessive swelling at or near an injection site, or other symptoms of general illness such a high temperature, chills, severe headaches or breathing difficulties. "Early treatment with antibiotics is essential for a successful recovery."

Read more...

The Pakistan Customs’ Drug Enforcement Cell (DEC), Karachi Airport Unit has seized 1kg of fine quality heroin that was concealed in the suitcase and footwear of a Ukrainian passenger.

The Pakistan Customs’ Drug Enforcement Cell (DEC), Karachi Airport Unit has seized 1kg of fine quality heroin that was concealed in the suitcase and footwear of a Ukrainian passenger.“The DEC staff posted at the international departure hall of the Jinnah International Airport intercepted an outgoing passenger, Makbul Khan, a Pakistan-born Ukrainian leaving for Donetsk in Ukraine via Dubai by Fly Dubai Airlines flight FZ332 from Karachi,” Customs official Qamar Thalho said on Saturday.

 “As the passenger could not satisfactorily reply to the Customs’ questioning, his baggage comprising a trolley suitcase was thoroughly examined, leading to the recovery of 700 grams of fine quality heroin cleverly concealed in false cavities and the metallic frame of the suitcase. Subsequently, the Customs staff also examined the passenger’s footwear and found another 300 grams heroin, which the carrier had concealed in the shoes’ cavities under the innersoles.”

 

The passenger was arrested and a prosecution case under Control of Narcotics Substances Act, 1997 registered against him. During initial investigation, it was learnt that the Khan was born in Peshawar and a doctor by profession.

 

The Customs DEC staff had earlier arrested two Pakistani passengers for smuggling the contraband Amphetamine to Kuala Lumpur and heroin to Jeddah. This was in addition to the arrest of a Pakistani passenger, who was trying to smuggle a prohibited amount of foreign currency out of the country.

 

Read more...

Guatemalan man was arrested at a South Texas border crossing after arriving in the country with more than two pounds of what tested positive for heroin hidden in his stomach.

Guatemalan man was arrested at a South Texas border crossing after arriving in the country with more than two pounds of what tested positive for heroin hidden in his stomach.

Officials at the Veterans International Bridge between Brownsville and Matamoros, Mexico, stopped Marco Vinicio Lopez-Davilaon Tuesday. Court records show he was ordered to remain in federal custody until a detention hearing Wednesday in Brownsville.

A federal affidavit says the 28-year-old Guatemalan arrived at the border in a taxi and asked to be admitted to the United States. After he diverted for secondary examination, he admitted that he was carrying about 80 packets of heroin to Philadelphia. He was taken to a hospital, where the packets were recovered.

Defense attorney Rebecca RuBane declined to comment on the case on Saturday.




Read more...

DRUGMARINES Long range subs are apparently going all the way from Ecuador to Europe

DRUGMARINE subs heading for Europe. Little is known about these, expect that they exist. These subs would be more at risk of being lost because of accident or bad weather than being spotted. European navies (especially Portugal and Spain) and coast guards have been alerted and are looking.Long range subs are apparently going all the way from Ecuador to Europe, bypassing the Mexican cartels (who have been fighting each other, in a big way, for the last five years).Despite losing nearly a hundred of these vessels to the U.S. and South American naval forces (and dozens more to accidents and bad weather) the drug gangs have apparently concluded that the subs are the cheapest and most reliable way to ship the drugs. It's currently estimated that over 80 percent of the cocaine smuggled into the United States leaves South America via these submarines or semi-submersible boats.

Most of these craft are still "semi-submersible" type vessels. These are 10-20 meter (31-62 foot) fiberglass boats, powered by a diesel engine, with a very low freeboard and a small "conning tower" providing the crew (of 4-5), and engine, with fresh air and permitting the crew to navigate. A boat of this type was, since they first appeared in the early 1990s, thought to be the only practical kind of submarine for drug smuggling. But in the last decade the drug gangs have developed real submarines, capable of carrying 5-10 tons of cocaine that cost a lot more and don't require a highly trained crew. These subs borrow a lot of technology and ideas from the growing number of recreational submarines being built.

The Colombian security forces and other Latin American navies have been responsible for most of these vessel captures. Usually these boats are sunk by their crews when spotted but the few that were captured intact revealed features like an extensive collection of communications gear, indicating an effort to avoid capture by monitoring many police and military frequencies. The Colombians have captured several of these vessels before they could be launched. In the last few years the Colombians have been collecting a lot of information on those who actually builds these subs for the drug gangs and FARC (leftist rebels that provide security and often transportation for moving cocaine). That includes finding out where the construction takes place.

Colombian police have arrested dozens of members of gangs that specialized in building submarines and semisubmersible boats. As police suspected, some of those arrested were retired or on active duty with the Colombian Navy (which operates two 1970s era German built Type 209 submarines). These arrests were part of an intense effort to find the people responsible for building subs for cocaine gangs. Find the builders and you stop the building efforts.

Over the last few years the U.S. and Colombia have been desperately seeking the specialists responsible for designing and building these craft. This soon led to identifying and arresting leaders of the sub building groups. The U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) helped out, providing many valuable tips.

The submarines that have been captured have, on closer examination, turned out to be more sophisticated than first thought. The outer hulls are made of strong, lightweight Kevlar/carbon fiber that is sturdy enough to keep the sub intact but very difficult to detect with most sensors. The hulls cannot survive deep dives but these boats don't have to go deep to get the job done. The diesel-electric power supply, diving and surfacing system, and navigational systems of captured subs was often in working order. It was believed that some of those who built these boats probably had experience building recreational subs. The sub builders also had impressive knowledge of the latest materials used to build exotic boats. It had already become clear that something extraordinary was happening in these improvised jungle shipyards.

Ecuadoran police found the first real diesel-electric cocaine carrying submarine two years ago. It was nearly completed and ready to go into a nearby river, near the Colombian border, and move out into the Pacific Ocean. The 23.5 meter (73 foot) long, three meter (nine feet) in diameter boat was capable of submerging. The locally built boat had a periscope, conning tower, and was air conditioned. It had commercial fish sonar mounted up front so that it could navigate safely while underwater. There was a toilet on board but no galley (kitchen) or bunks. Submarine experts believed that a five man crew could work shifts to take care of navigation and steering the boat. The boat could submerge to about 16 meters (50 feet). At that depth the batteries and oxygen on board allowed the sub to travel up 38 kilometers in one hour, or at a speed of 9 kilometers an hour for 5-6 hours. This would be sufficient to escape any coastal patrol boats that spotted the sub while it moved along on the surface (its normal travel mode). The boat could also submerge to avoid very bad weather. The sub carried sufficient diesel fuel to make a trip from Ecuador to Mexico. There was a cargo space that could hold up to seven tons of cocaine.

The sub was captured where it was being assembled and a nearby camp for the builders appeared to house about fifty people. A lot of evidence was collected, and apparently the U.S. DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) used that to develop clues about who was involved. It was the DEA that put together the pieces that led to identifying Meyendorff and locating him in Argentina.

The Ecuadoran boat was the first such sub to be completed but not the first to be attempted. A decade ago Russian naval architects and engineers were discovered among those designing and building a similar, but larger, boat. However, that effort did not last, as the Russian designs were too complex and expensive. It was found easier to build semi-submersible craft. But more and more of these new type subs are being found.

Read more...

Paul Beales, 40 faces up to 20 years in an Indonesian prison after he was charged Monday with smuggling cocaine into the resort island of Bali

Briton faces 20 years over Bali cocaine bust

Paul Beales, 40, was arrested in May and linked to British woman Lindsay June Sandiford, who was arrested separately when she arrived at the island's airport with nearly five kilos (11 pounds) of cocaine.

"The defendant, together with Julian Anthony Ponder and Lindsay June Sandiford, was involved in a conspiracy to sell and purchase cocaine," prosecutor Wayan Terima Darsana told the Denpasar district court.

"He could face a jail term up to 20 years," the prosecutor said. Custom officials said that the cocaine had a street value of more than 23 billion rupiah (S$2.93 million).

Indonesia enforces stiff penalties including life imprisonment and death for drug trafficking.

Two members of an Australian drug smuggling gang known as the "Bali Nine" who were arrested in 2005 are on death row, while seven others face lengthy jail terms.Another Australian, Schapelle Corby, who was sentenced to 20 years in prison for smuggling 4.1 kilos of marijuana in 2005, recently had her term slashed by five years after a clemency appeal to President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.

Read more...

Tuesday, September 4

Griselda Blanco, gunned down in Medellin, Colombia Two armed riders pulled up to Blanco as she was leaving a butcher shop in her hometown

Florida Department of Corrections

Griselda Blanco in 2004.

The convicted Colombian drug smuggler known as the “Godmother of Cocaine,” Griselda Blanco, 69, was gunned down by a motorcycle-riding assassin in Medellin, Colombian national police confirmed late Monday, according to the Miami Herald.

Blanco spent nearly 20 years in prison in the United States for drug trafficking and three murders before being deported to Colombia in 2004, the Herald reported.

Two armed riders pulled up to Blanco as she was leaving a butcher shop in her hometown, and one shot her twice in the head, the Herald reported, citing a report in El Colombiano newspaper.

Family members said Blanco had cut her ties to organized crime after returning to her country, the BBC reported. Police said they were investigating the motive.

Blanco was one of the first to engage in large-scale smuggling of cocaine into the United States from Colombia and set up many of the routes used by the Medellin cartel after she was sentenced in the United States in 1985, the BBC reported.

Investigators told the Herald that they estimate conservatively that Blanco was behind about 40 slayings. She was convicted in connection with three murders: Arranging the killing of two South Miami drug dealers who had not paid for a delivery, and ordering the assassination of a former enforcer for her organization, an operation that resulted in the death of the target’s 2-year-old son, the Herald reported.

Three of Blanco’s husbands were killed in violence related to drugs, the Herald reported, and one of her sons was named Michael Corleone, a reference to “The Godfather” movies.

Blanco is credited with originating motorcycle assassinations, the Herald reported.

“This is classic live-by-the-sword, die-by-the-sword,” filmmaker Billy Corben, who with Alfred Spellman made two “Cocaine Cowboys” documentaries, told the Herald. “Or in this case, live-by-the-motorcycle-assassin, die-by-the-motorcycle assassin.”

Read more...
Related Posts with Thumbnails
Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

  © Distributed by Blogger Templates. Blogger templates Newspaper III by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP