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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Thursday, June 23

Bad signs for Bali Nine pair on death row

Indonesia's president has dealt a blow to the fates of two members of the Bali Nine drug smuggling ring, signalling a reluctance to save foreigners from execution.

Bali Nine ring leader Andrew Chan's last chance to avoid the firing squad is a plea for mercy to Indonesia's president, but Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono says he rejects almost all mercy pleas.

Indonesians have been outraged by Saudi Arabia's decision to execute an Indonesian maid convicted of murdering her employer.

Today the president said his government could do little to stop them.

He then added: "When our brothers or sisters commit serious crimes and receive capital punishment, why should we give people from other nations clemency?"

Another Bali Nine drug smuggler, Myuran Sukumaran, is still waiting on his final court appeal against the death penalty.

 

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Prosecutors charge hip-hop producer as drug kingpin

A prominent record executive known as "Jimmy Henchman" was arrested Tuesday on charges that he spearheaded a drug-trafficking ring responsible for shuttling millions of dollars and hundreds of kilograms of cocaine between Los Angeles and New York.

The arrest comes less than a week after "Henchman," whose given name is James Rosemond, was implicated in a 1994 robbery of the rapper Tupac Shakur by a man, Dexter Isaac, who claimed Rosemond paid him $2,500 for the attack. Isaac, who is serving a life sentence for murder and robbery, linked Rosemond to the shooting in a statement released to a hip-hop website. Rosemond has denied the allegations through his lawyer.

Rosemond, 46, the CEO and co-founder of Czar Entertainment, is scheduled to make his initial appearance in Brooklyn federal court, following his arrest Tuesday morning by U.S. Marshals and agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency.

He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison if convicted on the charges, according to federal prosecutors.

A spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office in Brooklyn said prosecutors will seek to have Rosemond held without bail. Rosemond's attorney, Jeffrey Lichtman, said he expects to address the bail issue at a later hearing.

Federal agents have been investigating Rosemond since 2009 in connection with what they allege is a large-scale, bi-coastal narcotics trafficking organization that relied on numerous cohorts and conspirators in both Los Angeles and New York "to ensure a near-continuous flow of cocaine and cash," according to the complaint.


Prosecutors allege that Rosemond came up with a number of schemes to smuggle the drugs and money since 2008. At first, the drugs were shipped in vacuum-sealed packages filled with mustard, to evade drug-detecting dogs.

When law enforcement officials began to catch on, Rosemond started sending drugs via freight ostensibly intended for the performance artists he managed, according to the complaint. When one of those packages was seized by authorities, Rosemond shifted to smuggling drugs in hidden compartments of cars shipped from the west to east coasts, prosecutors allege.

The complaint is based on information gleaned from Rosemond's financial records, recorded phone calls, emails, text messages and extensive testimony from two cooperating witnesses who confessed to participating in the conspiracy following arrests on related charges, according to prosecutors. The complaint also says that searches have uncovered firearms belonging to Rosemond's organization.

"The indictment is the result of witnesses who have been threatened and bribed and have otherwise spent lifetimes lying," Rosemond's attorney, Lichtman, said Tuesday. "The government wants a trial; they're going to get a trial."

A call to Czar Entertainment was not answered.

 

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Sunday, June 19

international cocaine czar who managed to distribute cocaine worth 160 billion won ($147 million) from South America to European countries was revealed to be a 59-year-old Korean

international cocaine czar who managed to distribute cocaine worth 160 billion won ($147 million) from South America to European countries was revealed to be a 59-year-old Korean man with Suriname citizenship, prosecutors said. The man is said to have formed ties with the largest drug cartel in South America and distributed an unprecedented amount of cocaine.

The Supreme Prosecutors’ Office said yesterday that the Korean man surnamed Cho has been indicted on charges of smuggling cocaine from South America into Europe using Koreans as carriers after forming a drug ring in both Korea and South America. He was extradited to Korea in May. Cho hired 12 Koreans residing in South America and delivered a total of 48.5 kilograms (107 pounds) of cocaine into European countries from 2004 to 2005. But prosecutors said the Koreans he hired were unaware of the fact that they were taking part in the drug smuggling. After forming a drug ring with Europeans, Surinamese and Koreans, Cho delivered 37 kilograms of cocaine to French Guiana in 2004 and 11.5 kilograms from Peru to Spain in 2005, prosecutors said. The total amount of 48.5 kilograms of cocaine is reported to be the largest amount for a drug smuggling case ever investigated by Korea. The amount was enough for 1.6 million people to be using the drug at the same time. Prosecutors said that Cho “used naive Koreans including housewives and young women in South America as carriers by tricking them into thinking they were carrying a gemstone.” Cho paid them 5 million won per trip. Four hired Koreans were caught at airport customs in France and Peru.

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Monday, June 13

The “corrupt” former border guard Baljinder Kandola with Canada Border Services Agency conspired with drug smuggler Shminder Johal and two others four years ago with to smuggle at least 208 kilos of cocaine and firearms into Canada

The “corrupt” former border guard Baljinder Kandola with Canada Border Services Agency conspired with drug smuggler Shminder Johal and two others four years ago with to smuggle at least 208 kilos of cocaine and firearms into Canada, according to Crown counsel James Torrance.
The B.C.-based drug smuggling operation is alleged to have involved Johal and Herman Riar driving drugs across the Pacific border crossing, with carefully-predetermined stops at the booth manned by Kandola, reported the Province newspaper.
Riar has already pleaded guilty to drug smuggling and was sentenced in January 2010 to 12 years in jail.
Kandola, with six years’ service with the Canada Border Services Agency, is alleged to have sent texts to Riar and Johal giving them the green light to come to his booth. The Crown says Johal recruited the border guard by offering him money.
Torrance said he will produce cellphone intercept transcripts and surveillance by police on both sides of the border showing the conspiracy involving the three men.
Johal and Riar slipped through the border with ease, allegedly thanks to Kandola, on at least three drug runs from Washington state between May 2007 until they were arrested Oct. 25, 2007.
Kandola, meanwhile, was being monitored by the CBSA, who noticed that Kandola did not check the computer database on Riar and Johal.
CBSA eventually bugged Kandola’s booth as part of joint undercover operation with the RCMP.
Torrance said he will introduce evidence about three trips across the border made by Riar and Johal on July 28, Sept. 7 and Oct. 25, 2007.
The defence has agreed to allow telephone transcripts to be introduced as evidence.
Kandola would send text messages to Johal indicating the time that it was safe to cross, court heard. A short time before the trio was arrested, Kandola sent a text to Johal saying “Aja,” which means “come” in Punjabi, Torrance told Romilly.
The first witness to take the stand, RCMP (retired) Corp. Joe Sellinger described surveillance of Johal’s vehicle near the Pacific border crossing on Oct. 25, 2007.
Johal evaded a “staged” accident scene and was pulled over by police forces.
Sellinger testified that he tested a sample on the spot from 11 large boxes full of bricks of cocaine and “it turned blue right away,” signifying pure cocaine.
Torrance said surveillance and intercepted calls showed the three men in close contact with each other prior to each border crossing.
Kandola’s lawyer James Sutherland have indicated his defence will be that his client did not know what was in the boxes.
At the end of the opening day, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Selwyn Romilly was asked if Johal and Kandola, two burly men in the prisoners box, could speak to each other.
Johal’s lawyer Mark Bussanich asked if bail conditions could be varied to allow the two men, whose families sit on opposite sides of the court, to speak to each other.
Romilly agreed to let the alleged co-conspirators speak, but only “in the presence of counsel.”
Both men pleaded not guilty on Monday to multiple drug and firearm charges, including trafficking along with breach of trust and bribing an official. The trial will continue until June 30.

 

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Saturday, June 4

Airport drug smuggling operation crushed

investigation has been launched to identify corrupt airport employees in Bermuda and the US after a “significant” quantity of drugs was imported to the Island.

US and Bermuda Government security agencies joined forces to successfully crush a bid to bring drugs into Bermuda via Philadelphia International Airport on Wednesday.

According to a Police spokesman, three men were arrested in the Shelly Bay, Hamilton Parish area for allegedly importing the controlled drugs around 4pm that day.

“The arrests were the result of a prolonged investigative effort with partner agencies in the United States. At the time of the arrests, a number of evidential items were seized, including a substantial sum of cash.

“The three persons arrested remain in custody while the investigation continues,” added the spokesman.

The US Consulate also released a statement last night, which said: “On June 1, 2011, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)/Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Drug Enforcement Administration, the Bermuda Police Service (BPS), HM Customs and US Airways Security successfully dismantled an organisation that exploited commercial aircraft to smuggle narcotics into Bermuda from the United States via Philadelphia International Airport.

“This coordinated investigation identified corrupt current and former airport/airline employees in the US and Bermuda who utilised their positions to circumvent airport security and federal inspection procedures to smuggle narcotics.

“ICE /HSI has, and will, continue to utilise its broad investigative authority to target those individuals that pose direct threats to our communities both in the US and abroad.

US Consul General Grace Shelton added that: “Law enforcement is an area of excellent cooperation between the United States and Bermuda.

“Bilateral collaboration between allies can yield strong results, and I am pleased that working together we have been able to shut down this smuggling operation.”

 

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El Paso teacher accused of trying to smuggle drugs into the U.S. remains in jail in Juarez,

El Paso teacher accused of trying to smuggle drugs into the U.S. remains in jail in Juarez, and a Mexican judge has ruled that she'll stay there until her case goes to trial.

NewsChannel 9 was there as family, friends and others supporters of Ana Isela Martinez-Anaya waited outside the courthouse in Juarez when the decision came down.

Many of them broke down and started crying. Martinez-Anaya claims someone planted more than 100 pounds of marijuana in the trunk of her car, but the judge said there's not enough evidence to prove that.

He believes she intended to cross the border with the with the load of drugs.

Martinez-Anaya is a teacher at La Fe Prep School in Downtown El Paso.

She used to work in the EPISD, but the district tells us she resigned in 2007.

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Two former deputies with a southern Arizona sheriff's office have been charged with stealing money that they believed came from drug smugglers

Two former deputies with a southern Arizona sheriff's office have been charged with stealing money that they believed came from drug smugglers and trying to distribute drugs.

The U.S. Attorney's Office announced the charges Friday after a superseding indictment was unsealed Thursday.

The indictment alleges that former Pima County Sheriff's Deputy Miguel Arvizu arranged for fellow Deputy Francisco Jimenez to perform traffic stops last year on vehicles belonging to drug traffickers and steal the money inside.

The indictment also says that on Nov. 24, Arvizu arranged for Jimenez to provide "security," while others stole drugs and money from a storage facility in Green Valley.

In all, Arvizu is charged with eight counts that include theft of government money and attempted distribution of 3 kilograms of cocaine. Jimenez faces similar charges.

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Pharma company MD arrested for trafficking date rape drug

After seizure of a large consignment of the drug, investigations reveal that company was part of a larger trafficking syndicate

The managing director of a drug company was arrested along with three associates yesterday, in connection with smuggling psychotropic substances.

The Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI) arrested Abhijit Konduskar, managing director of Kumud Drugs Private Limited and owner of Konduskar Travels, his general manager Nilesh Mehta, the receiver of the consignment Jayantilal Khotari, and a middleman Sandeep Ahire.

 Sleuths at DRI suspect that Konduskar (29) was part of a larger syndicate involved in the smuggling of the drug Ketamine Hydrochloride to Europe.

Ketamine, also known as the date rape drug in party circles, when administered to an unsuspecting victim, has a sedative effect. It is often used to spike drinks, before sexual assault is committed on the victim. This drug is in great demand in Europe, particularly in the United Kingdom.

Boxes enclosing 200 kilograms of the drug were seized from an Andheri bound Tata Sumo on Wednesday. The boxes were traced back to Kumud Drugs Private Limited, a pharmaceutical company of which Konduskar was the managing director. DRI officials thereafter recovered 32 drums containing the drug from a godown in Sangli.

Officials have also revealed that the company owned a factory at Sangli, from where he supervised the distribution of the drug. He was aided by A Mondal, the general manager (production).

Andheri resident Jayantilal Kothari, receiver of the contraband, told officials that he had earlier smuggled more than 1,000 kg of Ketamine out of the country.

Investigations have yielded that Konduskar had on an earlier occasion sent substantial amounts of the drug to two men Ghatkopar resident Chetan Mehta and Dahisar resident Parag Mehta. The consignment ultimately found its way to United Kingdom.

Investigations have also revealed that Konduskar had been involved in the purchase of large quantities of Mephedrone, which was manufactured by Onkar Industries, located at Islampur near Sangli.

 

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DEA agent infiltrated cartel in Colombia

For nearly five years he traveled under a fake name, sending hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money to members of an infamous Colombian cartel. He won the trust of influential money launderers, meeting in hotel lobbies, parking lots, and bustling food courts to discuss cocaine shipments to Houston and pick up suitcases stuffed with drug money.



The Boston-based agent of the US Drug Enforcement Agency, working undercover, infiltrated a major money-laundering and drug-smuggling ring, unearthing the evidence that built the base for some 20 arrests of suspected operatives in Colombia’s largest drug cartel, La Oficina de Evigado, federal officials said this week.

The men arrested in Colombia and the United States include three suspects and one fugitive with ties to Boston. Some still face extradition to the United States, but are all slated to stand trial in Boston on charges of money laundering.

The undercover agent, a DEA financial investigator whose identity has not been released, spelled out in a lengthy affidavit released Tuesday the ring he infiltrated, outlining a complex network of contacts and couriers who allegedly transferred money from the streets of the United States to the pockets of cartel kingpins.

“You’re out there with people who live, breathe, and spend all their time on the streets,’’ said DEA special agent Chris Jakim, referring to undercover narcotics agents. “It’s just you and the bad guys. They’re armed. And they know who belongs and who doesn’t.’’

In 2007, the Boston agent began infiltrating a ring of money launderers and brokers based in Venezuela and Colombia with the help of a confidential informant.

The agent posed as a high-level money launderer and brought in other undercover agents, who were soon picking up deliveries of drug money in an array of cities across the United States, including Woburn, Revere, Somerville, and Boston. He deposited the money into DEA-controlled bank accounts in the United States, then wired the cash to broker accounts in the United States, Panama, the Caribbean, Portugal, and China, the affidavit said.

The agent documented that brokers working for the cartel paid commissions to money launderers, including the DEA agent. The brokers then funneled money through private exchange houses in Colombia or through illicit organizations like the Black Market Peso Exchange to convert dollars to other types of currency, the affidavit said.

The arrests deal a serious blow to the cartel, damaging the illegal money machine that converts drugs to cash and fuels the drug production process, authorities said. “If we can hit them in the pocket, where it hurts, we can make a significant dent,’’ US Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said during a press conference Wednesday.

The bulk of the DEA undercover agent’s work involved following drug money. In Boston, he deposited money in installments of $10,000 or less into accounts controlled by banks including Wachovia, Citibank, and Bank of America. The Bank Secrecy Act, aimed at money launderers, requires a disclosure form with any deposit greater than $10,000.

The agent coordinated meetings and pickups through heavily encoded electronic messages, including texts, e-mails, and phone conversations.

In one cryptic e-mail referring to a money transfer to China, the agent told a Colombian drug kingpin, “I received your e-mail, and you understand that it takes about five days to cross the lake . . . and you know how the dragons are.’’

The agent and his contacts referred to cocaine as “fine white fabric,’’ bank accounts as “bodegas’’ and amounts like $245,000 as “245 feet.’’ Agents go through special training to learn such slang, the DEA’s Jakim said.

During a trip to Colombia in December 2010, the agent met with a drug magnate and a Colombian businessman in the lobby of a J.W. Marriott hotel in Bogota, the affidavit said. In a recorded conversation with the drug magnate, Aldo Fernando Guerrero Clavijo, also known as Rolo, the agent discussed amounts of up to $900,000 to be picked up in Puerto Rico and Guatemala, fake paperwork to throw J.P. Morgan off the scent of his deposits, and sales of up to 1,000 kilograms of cocaine at Colombia prices — significantly lower than US prices.

Guerrero later told the agent he liked his work because he took two to three days to launder the money, as opposed to the 10 to 15 days others required, the affidavit said.

 

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Chinese police have detained 10 suspects of a cross-border drug trafficking case in Dandong,

Chinese police have detained 10 suspects of a cross-border drug trafficking case in Dandong, a Liaoning Province city neighboring the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

The group was caught handling 450 grams of methamphetamine, commonly known as ice, said the Dandong police.

The suspects, all Chinese citizens, were caught carrying the drug and 150,000 yuan (about 23,145 U.S. dollars), according to the police.

Police are pursuing two others believed to be connected with the group

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Second hand car dealer Raymond Casling was sentenced yesterday alongside four gang members for their roles in two separate drugs conspiracies.

DRUGS boss known as "Roy Cropper" has been jailed for ten-and-a-half years.

Second hand car dealer Raymond Casling was sentenced yesterday alongside four gang members for their roles in two separate drugs conspiracies.

Teesside Crown Court heard how Casling, 32, of Canterbury Road, Redcar, was the linchpin in two plots.

In the first, Reginald Breeze, 38, of Herschell Street, Redcar, together with 19-year-old Scott Lacy, of no fixed address, would store and supply fake ecstasy.

Breeze had 165 white tablets on him when he was stopped by police in Loftus in July 2009.

Officers found 2,550 more pills in the joiner's home.

The tablets, embossed with a bunny logo, looked like ecstasy but turned out to be what was then a legal high.

It has since been categorised as a Class C drug.

Marc Carlyon, 24, and Michael Lance, 25, were later arrested after police watched them sell cocaine to a man.

A search of their home in Brimham Court, Redcar, revealed a dealer's list, plus small bags of low-purity cocaine, scales and cutting agent.

The pair stored ten numbers on their phones for Casling all under the name of Roy Cropper - a character in ITV soap opera Coronation Street.

Christopher Attwooll said the main evidence against the men was a large number of text messages between Casling and the four others.

When police knocked down Casling's door on Canterbury Road, Redcar they found him ripping up pieces of paper.

The prosecution said this was a "tick list" of drug debtors, dealers and users.

All five men denied the drugs conspiracy but were convicted after a trial.

David Lamb, representing Casling, said his client was a family man with two children who had run several successful businesses.

Breeze's barrister, Rod Hunt, said his client had made full admissions when arrested, while Jonathan Walker, mitigating for Lacy, said his client had grown up since the incident.

Carlyon's barrister said his client had been "sucked in" to the conspiracy after developing a serious gambling habit.

Father-of-one Lance was a minor player, his lawyer said.

Judge Tony Briggs sentenced Breeze and Lacy to 18 months.

Carlyon was handed a three-and-a-half year term, while Lance was sentenced to two-and-a-half years.

Lacy is already serving a four-year sentence for heroin dealing in 2008.

Casling was jailed for three years in 2003 after admitting possessing cocaine with intent to supply.

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100 pounds of cocaine found in vehicle's roof

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Dennis DeConcini Port in Nogales prevented a cocaine smuggling attempt by a Mexican man accompanied by his family on May 28.

The seizure occurred when a 40-year-old Mexican man, his 36-year-old Mexican wife and their two children attempted to enter the United States through a Dennis DeConcini Port vehicle lane and were referred for a secondary inspection. Subsequently, CBP officers observed discrepancies in the roof of the vehicle followed by a narcotics detection canine alert. Further investigation led to the discovery of 52 packages of cocaine concealed in a non-factory compartment in the vehicle’s roof.

The narcotics weighed more than 123 pounds with an estimated value of $1,119,300.

The man was taken into custody and turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations for further investigation. The wife and children were allowed to withdraw their application for admission.   

“Preventing this amount of dangerous narcotics from entering our communities is very significant,” said Acting Nogales Area Port Director Craig Hope, “I am very proud of our CBP officers’ keen sense of observation and their vigilance and dedication to the protection of our nation."

Since launching the Southwest Border Initiative in March 2009, the Department of Homeland Security has engaged in an unprecedented effort to bring focus and intensity to Southwest border security, coupled with a reinvigorated, smart and effective approach to enforcing immigration laws in the interior of our country.

A criminal complaint is simply the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity and raises no inference of guilt.  An individual is presumed innocent until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt

The Office of Field Operations is responsible for securing our borders at the ports of entry.  U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers’ primary mission is anti-terrorism; they screen all people, vehicles, and goods entering the United States, while facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel into and out of the United States. Their mission also includes carrying out traditional border-related responsibilities, including narcotics interdiction, enforcing immigration law, protecting the nation’s food supply and agriculture industry from pests and diseases, and enforcing trade laws.

 

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RCMP arrest three men, seize helicopter in drug raid

RCMP drug investigators have arrested three men and seized a helicopter after raiding a Maple Ridge property growing almost seven times more pot than its two medical marijuana licences permitted.

The Federal Drug Enforcement Branch executed a search warrant at the property in the 26000-block of 112th Avenue on May 26, and found 1,490 plants instead of the 220 permitted by two licences provided by Health Canada to grow medical pot.

Police arrested two suspects inside the barn where the pot was being cultivated. And police seized an R44 helicopter, two pickup trucks and three marijuana-growing labs that were not yet in use.

"During this investigation it became very clear to police that marijuana from this licensed operation was being sold in the Lower Mainland. This investigation is ongoing and police anticipate more arrests," Const. Michael McLaughlin said.

None of the three men has yet been charged. McLaughlin would not name them, but did say all three were in their mid-30s and live in the Lower Mainland.

"One of the men arrested was named on the licence as a designated grower," he said. "He does not have a criminal record, but is known to police. The others were not on the licence, but are known to police."

McLaughlin said details of the RCMP's investigation have been passed on to Health Canada.

The elaborate Maple Ridge operation included surveillance cameras and motion detectors. The property featured a house, a large grow barn and several trailers. Police across B.C. have complained in recent weeks that medical-marijuana licences are being abused by gangs and organized crime.

Last month, RCMP Supt. Brian Cantera told The Vancouver Sun that police have encountered people with criminal records for trafficking somehow managing to get licences. And, he said, many licence holders are growing far beyond their permitted quantity.

"What we are seeing, and the intelligence we are receiving, is that largely medicinal marijuana grow-ops today are operating solely under the guise of the licence to protect their criminal activity," Cantera said.

Municipal officials also are concerned about the impact of medical-marijuana grow-ops on neighbourhoods, particularly the fire hazard that comes from uninspected wiring.

Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts has led a motion that will go before the Canadian Federation of Municipalities this weekend, demanding Health Canada force medical-marijuana applicants to also get a municipal permit to "demonstrate that the proposed location for the growing operation is in compliance with all local bylaws and all electrical, fire, health, building and safety regulations."

The motion was passed unanimously Thursday at the Big City Mayors' Caucus, allowing it to be brought before the general membership at the annual meeting now going on in Halifax. The background document presented by Watts noted that B.C. has the "highest authorization level in Canada" for medical-marijuana licences.

"Local governments have no knowledge of the location of such marijuana-growing operations to ensure that appropriate permits are issued and inspections conducted so that the buildings/sites containing medical-marijuana grow operations meet all necessary building, fire and electrical safety regulations and that they do not create a nuisance to others," the document states.

 

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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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