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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Wednesday, March 31

Julian Gilbey, 42, was spared execution by machine-gun and instead given a life sentence

Julian Gilbey, 42, was spared execution by machine-gun and instead given a life sentence. He served more than eight years in a Bangkok jail before the Thai authorities agreed to send him to Scotland to see out his sentence.Under Scots law, Gilbey must be told the minimum term he has to complete – the "punishment part" – before he can apply for parole.Appearing before Lord Emslie at the High Court in Edinburgh yesterday, the judge was told it was a unique situation. Lord Emslie has requested more information about life sentences in Thailand and the transfer agreement before setting Gilbey's tariff. The case was continued until next month.Gilbey, a former English language teacher, is from Sussex but has family in Scotland and it was the Scottish Government that handled his transfer. His counsel, Murray Macara, QC, said Gilbey had been arrested in October 2001 at Bangkok international airport, while waiting to board a flight to Taiwan. He was charged under Thai narcotics legislation and was alleged to have been in possession of 3.3 kilos of heroin in two packets.Four others were also arrested: a Dutch citizen and his girlfriend, a Thai woman, and two men from Nepal. After a trial lasting about nine months, the only person acquitted was the Thai woman."Mr Gilbey and the others were sentenced to death," Mr Macara said. "That was commuted to life imprisonment. He applied to the ministry of foreign affairs in Bangkok to take advantage of prisoner transfer arrangements between Thailand and this country. He arrived at the beginning of March and has been in Barlinnie for the last 20 days or so."He argued that, when setting the "punishment part" the High Court should select a period as if the offence had been committed in Scotland, where a life sentence was possible but had never been imposed. Lord Emslie, however, said it was a highly unusual situation and he understood he was not supposed to simply substitute a Scottish sentence for the Thai one.










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Last Updated: 30 March 2010 7:20 PM
Source: The Scotsman
Location: Edinburgh
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Tuesday, March 30

China, smuggling drugs constitutes a serious crime

China, smuggling drugs constitutes a serious crime. The penal code says an offender will be sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment, life imprisonment or death for smuggling drugs totaling 50 grams or more.

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Rene Hernandez,arrested after an undercover drug buy in October

Kenneth Gross said Framingham Police could have arrested his client, Rene Hernandez, after an undercover drug buy in October, but instead continued to buy drugs from him to get more significant charges."I'm arguing entrapment," said Gross. "They (police) like to bring more serious charges. They weren't satisfied with one transaction. They kept going back to him for more."Judge Douglas Stoddart told Gross police did "nothing illegal," and Gross agreed."My hat's off to the Police Department for manufacturing charges that put the defendant in a tough position with these charges," said Gross. "They could have stopped after the first transaction."Police arrested Hernandez, 35, on Friday at 3:15 p.m. after a months-long investigation, prosecutor Coli McMahon said.Undercover officers made at least five separate cocaine purchases from Hernandez between October and January.On Friday, they made one more purchase, and arrested him, McMahon said.When police searched him, they found 18 small plastic bags containing more than 14 grams of cocaine hidden in Hernandez's underwear, the prosecutor said.Hernandez, of 153 Grove St., was charged with trafficking in cocaine, distribution of cocaine, conspiracy to violate state drug laws and a school zone violation.McMahon argued for $10,000 bail, saying that Hernandez is facing a "significant" jail or prison sentence, including two years minimum if convicted of the school zone violation.Gross argued for $200 bail.Stoddart set bail at $7,700.If Hernandez does not make bail, he'll be held at the Middlesex Jail in Cambridge. He is due back in court on April 26 for a pretrial conference.

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Arrests of six African men and two women

The drug ring, believed to be run by Africans, was uncovered after three women were nabbed earlier trying to leave the country with drugs in separate operations.
Narcotics Department deputy director Datuk Othman Harun said police questioned the three drug mules and investigations led the team to various locations in the city where the Africans and two other women were picked up.The suspects, aged between 20 and 40, were remanded on Sunday to facilitate investigations under the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.In the first case, at the low-cost carrier terminal (LCCT) in Sepang, a Chinese national in her 20s was apprehended as she attempted to board a flight for China.Police found compartments inside the bag where about 1kg of cocaine was hidden. The cocaine was meant for distribution in China.In the second case, also at the LCCT, a Filipino woman was detained as she was preparing to board a flight for Vietnam.Police found 2kg of cocaine in her baggage valued at RM1.4 million. Further investigations revealed that she had been paid by a syndicate to smuggle the drugs abroad.The third case occurred at the Penang International Airport, Bayan Lepas, when a Chinese national in her 20s was nabbed after a tip-off.Police found 1.8kg of heroin grade IV taped to her armpits and thighs.The heroin, worth RM154,000, was meant for distribution in China."After the three women were questioned, police followed the trail which led to a West African drug ring operating in the city," Othman told the New Straits Times.It was learnt that the two women were responsible for recruiting foreigners, especially women, to smuggle the drugs abroad.

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Paul Dexter Farrow, who failed to appear at the court in the northern town of Rijeka, and Ivan Andabak stand accused of trying to smuggle 660 kilos

Paul Dexter Farrow, who failed to appear at the court in the northern town of Rijeka, and Ivan Andabak stand accused of trying to smuggle 660 kilos (1,452 pounds) of cocaine from Ecuador to the West African nation of The Gambia via Rijeka's port.
The drugs had an estimated value of some 60 million dollars (45 million euros).
The Rijeka court acquitted the two in 2007 due to lack of evidence, but after an appeal from the prosecution, the Supreme Court ordered a retrial in the case.
An Interpol arrest warrant has been issued for Farrow, 50, who was released from detention after being acquitted in 2007 and has left Croatia since, judge Djurdja Jovanic was quoted as saying by HINA.If convicted the two could face jail terms of between five and 40 years

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China has told Japan that Beijing will execute, as early as next Monday, a Japanese man convicted of attempting to smuggle stimulant drugs

China has told Japan that Beijing will execute, as early as next Monday, a Japanese man convicted of attempting to smuggle stimulant drugs from China to Japan in 2006, Japanese government sources said Tuesday.If the convict is executed, it will be the first execution by China of a Japanese national since the two countries normalized diplomatic relations in 1972.The execution may affect bilateral relations, which recently have moved in a positive direction following the detention by Chinese authorities of a Chinese man for allegedly poisoning frozen dumplings that made 10 people ill in Japan from late 2007 to early 2008.According to sources close to both sides, Beijingconveyed its decision to execute the Japanese national to Tokyo on Monday, three days after it informed the Japanese government of the detention of the suspect in the dumplings case. "The timing makes it difficult for Japan to object," one of the sources said.In late December last year, China executed a British man convicted of smuggling drugs into the country, but it drew strong criticism from British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and human rights groups.Critics said China had been careful about executing foreigners, especially those from developed countries, but given the country's rising clout in the world economy and its hard-line policy against crime, Beijing may have decided to apply the same capital punishment guidelines to foreigners as those for Chinese citizens.In July last year, Japan executed a Chinese national convicted of killing three of his compatriots in Kawasaki, Kanagawa Prefecture in 1999.The Japanese man was arrested in September 2006 for attempting to smuggle stimulant drugs totaling about 2.5 kilograms from the Dalian airport to Japan, according to the sources close to the bilateral

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Saturday, March 27

Tracey Hay and Clare Davison played “vital” roles in the plot, led by twice-convicted supplier Colin Noble and garage boss Marcus Moore

Tracey Hay and Clare Davison played “vital” roles in the plot, led by twice-convicted supplier Colin Noble and garage boss Marcus Moore, on the streets of Darlington. Hay was locked up for three years and three months, and Davison for 12 months after they admitted conspiracy to supply Class A drugs. Mother-of-three Davison, 34, allowed her home in Zetland Street to be used by Noble for cutting drugs after a previous den had been raided. Hay, 38, acted as a “decoy” for Noble by travelling with him to make deliveries, so his movements did not attract the attention of the police. Judge Brian Forster told the pair: “All people in the Darlington area must know the courts will deter people from supplying heroin.”
Fourteen people were arrested following Operation Mountcook – a sixmonth surveillance operation to find and stop heroin dealers. Seven of the suspects were charged, and last month, three of them received prison sentences totalling 14 years, while two were spared. Detective Constable Mick Trodden last night praised the sentences on Hay and Davison as a deterrent to others tempted to replace them. He said: “Anyone thinking of replacing these people now they have been locked up should look at the sentences and think again. They were a very active, well-organised group and filtered a lot of drugs into Darlington from elsewhere, predominantly Middlesbrough. “The ripple effect of the drugs problem is that addicts commit a lot of crime to fund their habits, and these sentences reflect the seriousness of that.”
Teesside Crown Court heard that police watched the movements of Noble, Moore and the dealers between January 14 and July 2 last year. Louise Reevell, mitigating, said heroin addict Hay, of Teal Road, was paid £20 a time for acting as Hay’s decoy during those months. Mrs Reevell said the mother-of-two had been hooked since the age of 20 following the cot death of her eightmonth- old daughter. David Lamb, for Davison, said she was not paid – other than in small amounts of heroin – for allowing Noble to use her home. He said the part-time cleaner never supplied anyone during the conspiracy, and has voluntarily sought help for her addiction since her arrest. The pair wept as Judge Forster jailed them and said: “The supply of heroin is a real problem in the Darlington area.”

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Five Vietnamese have been sentenced to death in a heroin smuggling case

Five Vietnamese have been sentenced to death in a heroin smuggling case that corrupt law enforcement officials initially suppressed, state media reported on Saturday.
Eleven people received life prison terms and 13 others were given lesser penalties when the court in northern Thai Nguyen province issued its verdict on Friday, the Vietnam News said.Among the guilty were former policemen, court officials and judges who accepted bribes to ensure the acquittal of the accused at their first trial in 2006, the report said.The Thanh Nien newspaper previously reported that three of those sentenced to death were individually charged with selling several kilograms (pounds) of heroin.International monitors rank Vietnam as one of the world's most corrupt nations, and the ruling Communist Party says tackling graft is one of its biggest challenges.Authorities in Vietnam do not issue death penalty statistics but the latest convictions bring to 31 the number of people sentenced to death this year, according to reports in state-linked media.

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Friday, March 26

Michael Welch received a sentence of nine years and four months, while co-conspirators Alex Shepherd, Barry Johnson, Daniel Green and Darren Harris

Michael Welch received a sentence of nine years and four months, while co-conspirators Alex Shepherd, Barry Johnson, Daniel Green and Darren Harris received stretches of between 18 and 30 months.Judge Stephen Wildblood QC, sentencing the men at Exeter Crown Court, said Welch's offending was 'in a different league to the others'.He said that Welch represented 'wasted potential' after he had admitted jointly conspiring with others to import cannabis using an ex-BT van which had been modified by installing a secret compartment.Welch, the former owner of Teazers bar on Union Street, also admitted possessing around 90 kilos of herbal cannabis with intent to supply.It was found by police kept in a container rented by Welch at a yard off Embankment Road. The court heard the cannabis had an estimated street value of £253,000.Welch, aged 38, also pleaded guilty to supplying cocaine, admitting in a statement he had purchased 1.275kg of cocaine with a purity of 30 per cent. He had then cut the cocaine's purity to five per cent using benzocaine, 50kgs of which was also found at his rented container. The court was told all that remained of the cocaine was the five '9-bar' wrappings it had come in.The court heard that during a raid at Welch's home in Callington on August 19, 2008, police found a mobile phone which had pictures of cash at his house which had been estimated by the Bank of England to total around £900,000.Shepherd, Johnson, Green and Harris had also pleaded guilty with Welch to the charge of jointly conspiring to fraudulently evade the prohibition on the importation of controlled drugs, between April 1, 2007, and August 20, 2008.Johnson was arrested with Green on September 20, 2007, after they had disembarked the evening ferry from Roscoff to Plymouth Millbay. Green was riding a motocross bike while Johnson was driving an ex-BT van which had been modified to contain a hidden compartment. However, when police and officers from HM Revenue and Customs stripped the van and uncovered the hidden compartment, they discovered it was empty.Shepherd, aged 40, of Wembury Road, Elburton, Plymstock; Johnson, aged 23, of Rolston Close, Tamerton Foliot; 24-year-old Green, of Woodbury Gardens, Plymouth; and Harris, aged 36, of Fraddon in Cornwall, all appeared in the dock alongside Welch, who had been held in custody since his arrest on August 19, 2008.Shepherd admitted possessing a quantity of cocaine, which was found by police following a raid on his rented workshop at Wixenford Farm in Plymstock on August 19, 2008.
The court heard officers found a number of packages including a 872-gramme pack of cocaine at 77 per cent purity, which was kept in a drill case. The court heard that when it was added to other smaller amounts of cocaine found it totalled just under a kilo, with a street value of £96,366.He also pleaded guilty to producing cannabis in a specially constructed 'secret' room in the same works building. The court heard he had admitted to being merely a 'gardener', tending the plants on behalf of others, and was paid by means of a reduction on drug debts he owed. In a statement to court he also admitted possessing criminal property, namely £20,180 in cash, which was found at his home when it was searched by police.Green had also pleaded guilty to possessing criminal property, namely 30,005 euros, which was found in the back panel of a motorbike jacket he was wearing on his return from France.Shepherd was jailed for 30 months, Harris for 24 months, Green for 20 months and Johnson for 18 months.

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Vicente Esteves, 37, admitted to conspiracy, running a drug trafficking network, drug possession with intent to distribute

Vicente Esteves, 37, admitted to conspiracy, running a drug trafficking network, drug possession with intent to distribute and two counts of money laundering. The network he headed imported about 1,000 kilos of cocaine a week (worth about $1 million street value) into the United States, said the report.

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Thursday, March 25

Carlos Madera Jr., 30, of Newark, pleaded guilty in Superior Court in Morristown to first-degree leading a cocaine-trafficking network


Carlos Madera Jr., 30, of Newark, pleaded guilty in Superior Court in Morristown to first-degree leading a cocaine-trafficking network in Essex and Morris counties. He admitted he conspired with two others, and supervised and managed the ring.His father, Carlos Madera Sr., 50, of Ohio, pleaded guilty to fourth-degree conspiracy to sell the packaging for cocaine.The duo were among 13 people arrested in December 2008 in Morris and Essex counties under a statewide initiative targeting criminal street gangs, authorities had said.Under the plea agreement, Morris County Assistant Prosecutor Bradford Seabury will seek a sentence for Madera Jr. of 20 years in prison, with at least 10 years of parole ineligibility. Some 60 other charges would be dismissed.Madera Jr. could have faced life-without-parole on the kingpin charge alone, said defense attorney Michael Kuhns.In entering the plea, Madera Jr. also exonerated his father from most of the charges, such as possession and intent to distribute cocaine, that the father was facing. As a result, Madera Sr. was to be released as soon as today from the Morris County jail.Judge David Ironson scheduled sentenced for the father-son duo on April 30.

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Harry Chown, aged 46, was hoping to be sent to jail in Exeter where he could pass the anabolic steroids on to prisoners.

Harry Chown, aged 46, was hoping to be sent to jail in Exeter where he could pass the anabolic steroids on to prisoners.But Plymouth magistrates heard that the drugs were found and Chown is now facing a longer stay in custody.Chown, of Vauxhall Street, the Hoe, admitted two counts of possessing anabolic steroids with intent to supply to inmates in Exeter Prison on March 22. He was found with a total of 157 pills. He also admitted theft of meat worth £44 from Iceland in the city centre on the same day.Magistrates ruled that their powers were not adequate and remanded him in custody to appear at crown court.Eoin McCarthy, for the Crown Prosecution Service, said that the hidden drugs were found in three wraps when he was body searched at a police station.He added: "He allowed himself to be deliberately arrested at Iceland so that he would then be conveyed to prison."Mr McCarthy said that Chown told police in interview that he had been bullied by someone to whom he owed money into smuggling the drugs.Paul Brookman, for Chown, made no bail application.He was remanded in custody to be sentenced by a crown court judge on May 7.

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charged with conspiring to distribute five kilograms and more of powder cocaine and 50 grams and more of crack cocaine

The organization, led by Mark Colon, distributed large quantities of powder cocaine and crack cocaine.The regularly obtained a supply of multiple kilogram quantities of cocaine from Puerto Rico, authorities said.The cocaine was transported to a location in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, then further distributed to locations in and around Middletown, as well as the Bronx and Queens. In and around Middletown, some of the powder cocaine was cooked into crack and further distributed in meetings in parking lots, homes and vehicles.charged in the indictment unsealed Wednesday are:
Mark Colon, 36, Fair Law New Jersey;
Angel Colon, 34, Mount Hope;
Gabriel Boria, 25, Middletown;
Benny Rosario, 34, Middletown;
Eduardo Silva, 27, Middletown;
Santos Crespo-Ayusa, 24, Wallkill;
Maudo Francisco Guiti-Lopez, 24, Bronx;
Jonathan Acsca-Rottes, 23, Bronx;
Herman Burton, 26, Middletown;
Donald Cannon, 36, Middletown;
Jorge Centeno, 32, Queens;
Jose De La Cruz, 34, Middletown;
Daamu Diggs, 36, Middletown;
Gualberto Fines, 32, Bronx;
Angel Gonzalez, 29, Middletown;
Otis Jones, 29, Newburgh;
Damian Lewis, 33, Middletown;
Thomas Carter Love, 25, Middletown;
Thelonious Monk, 38, Middletown;
Lionel Vega, 27, Middletown;
Puryear Venable, 26, Middletown;
Charles Warner, 24, Middletown;
Kevin Washington, 38, Port Jervis;
James Williams, 31, Middletown
They were all charged with conspiring to distribute five kilograms and more of powder cocaine and 50 grams and more of crack cocaine. If convicted, they all face life in federal prison.

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Terrence Bowler, 40, of Kingston, Surrey sentenced to 16 years

Terrence Bowler, 40, of Kingston, Surrey sentenced to 16 years. He Had pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import cannabis and conspiracy to launder money. The judge told him: ''You are described as a senior controlling figure in the criminal group. You attended regular 'board meetings' to plan the operations, you were seen to brief new recruits to the organisation, you rented the premises to store drugs, and others to store cash.'' The court had heard that the criminals were receiving the drugs at Harwich ferry port in Essex before transferring it to a warehouse in Chatham, Kent. But after the seizure they changed tactics, shipping the drugs to Hull and on to a warehouse in Leeds. The cannabis was then taken to a number of lock-up garages in places including Kingston, Worcester Park, Epsom and Ashtead. Much of the cash was laundered at an east London bureau de change, the World Currency Exchange, where gang members took holdalls stuffed with up to £20,000. A money counting machine recovered from the bureau de change had processed 520,000 individual notes - the equivalent of £10 million in £20 bills. The judge said the prosecution was right to describe the conspiracies contained in the case as drug smuggling and money laundering "on a massive scale". The wholesale value of £62 million of the drugs involved would have been "very much more" at street prices.
"It was imported into the UK and distributed, and the money was expertly laundered," he said. "The conspirators took care that the money and drugs were never together. I heard expert evidence that this was a deliberate decision so that, in the event of a police raid, the conspirators would not lose the money and drugs at once."
He added that the money laundering operation was highly successful, and succeeded in concealing large sums of money, much of it abroad, which may never be recovered.
"I have no doubt that large sums of money have been concealed abroad. Others of you have invested in property abroad." The court heard that the police had the gang under surveillance for 14 months from August 2007 to November 2008 and when the men were arrested officers seized 2,125lb (964kg) of skunk and £550,000 in cash.
Timothy Cray, prosecuting, said there was clear evidence to suggest the seizures were "just the tip of a large criminal iceberg".

The judge handed out 14-year jail terms to Peter Moran, 37, of Fulham, west London, and Mark Kinnimont, 40, of Surbiton, Surrey, who were said to be high up in the gang's hierarchy. They pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Roger Alexander, 44, of High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, who sold much of the imported product, earning £150 to £175 per kilo, was jailed for eight and a half years. He admitted conspiracy to supply controlled goods and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Liam Salter, 39, of Tadworth, Surrey, and Timothy Sullivan, 38, of Epsom, Surrey, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime, were jailed for seven years. David Couchman, 38, of Southwark, south London, who admitted similar offences, received six and a half years. Asim Bashir, 35, of Ilford, Essex, who ran the bureau de change, making sure the drug money was included with legitimate cash and laundered through the financial system, received six years. He was convicted of laundering the proceeds of crime. Barrie Burn, 60, of Bristol, received four years, and Peter Brown, 37, of Kingston, three and a half years. Both pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply controlled drugs. A driver for the gang, James Hay, 31, of Ashtead, Surrey, who was found guilty of possession with intent to supply controlled drugs after he was caught with 20kg of cannabis, received three and a half years.
Andrew West, 36, of Tadworth, another courier for the gang, who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime, received 18 months.

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Tuesday, March 23

Terrence Bowler and 11 other gang members are facing jail.

Terrence Bowler and 11 other gang members are facing jail. The gang brought at least £62 million of skunk cannabis into the UK hidden in boxes of flowers from Holland. At one point they were shipping in consignments worth up to £750,000 a week. Timothy Cray, prosecuting, said their activities amounted to "organised crime involving drug smuggling and money laundering on a massive scale". He told the court police had the gang under surveillance from August 2007 to November 2008. The defendants used rented lock-ups and garages in south-west London and north Surrey to store the drugs. Mr Cray said: "The cash-rich nature of the business set the defendants a number of challenges. "Storage of these amounts of money was something that caused the conspirators difficulty." He said one garage used by the defendants had built-in floor safes where £392,000 in cash was found, including £60,000 which had rotted through water damage. He said money was laundered at the World Currency Exchange, run by defendant Asim Bashir, where it was hidden among legitimate transactions. Mr Cray said: "The holdalls they carried in there contained approximately, as a maximum, £200,000 in £20 notes." When the men were arrested police seized 2,125lb (964kg) of skunk and £550,000 in cash. Mr Cray said: "Big as these seizures were, there is clear evidence to suggest that they were just the tip of a large criminal iceberg. "Only the defendants themselves will ever know the full extent of the drugs they imported into this country and the money that was generated as a result."
Mr Cray described Bowler as the gang's "number one" and a "senior controlling figure in the criminal group". Bowler associated with all the principal conspirators, holding regular meetings, dealing with problems and meeting new recruits, the court heard. Mr Cray said he enjoyed a lifestyle "with many of the trappings of worldly success," including a house in Kingston where £75,000 worth of jewellery was found. The 14-month undercover investigation found that the drugs were imported into the UK through Harwich ferry port in Essex and taken to a warehouse in Chatham, Kent. Officers at the port intercepted a shipment of 494lb (224kg), worth more than £750,000 to the gang, on July 16 2008, prompting a major change in tactics by the criminals. From September 2008, the drugs were shipped to Hull and taken to a warehouse in Leeds before being transported to one of a number of lock-up garages in Kingston, Worcester Park, Epsom and Ashtead, where the skunk cannabis would be unpacked and stored. Bowler, 40, of St Albans Road, Kingston, Surrey; Peter Moran, 37, of Fulham Palace Road, Fulham, west London; and Mark Kinnimont, 40, of Claremont Road, Surbiton, Surrey, made up the gang's "board of directors", and all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Liam Salter, David Couchman and Timothy Sullivan represented the next level of authority. Salter, 39, of Reeds Rest Lane, Tadworth, Surrey; Couchman, 38, of Sweeney Crescent, Southwark, south London; and Sullivan, 38, of Ash Court, Epsom, Surrey, all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Bashir, 35, of The Drive, Ilford, Essex, made sure the drug money was included with legitimate cash and laundered through the financial system. He was convicted of laundering the proceeds of crime. Roger Alexander, 44, of Churchill Close, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, sold much of the imported product, earning £150 to £175 per kilo. He admitted conspiracy to supply controlled goods and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Peter Brown, 37, of King Henry's Road, Kingston, was a late entrant into the operation, only joining in September 2008, but was key once the drugs started being imported to Leeds via Hull. He was witnessed meeting dealer Barrie Burn, 59, of Hinton Road, Bristol. Both men pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply controlled drugs. Andrew West, 36, of Willowbank Gardens, Tadworth, was a driver for the gang and pleaded guilty to conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime. Another driver, James Hay, 31, of Stonny Croft, Ashtead, who helped to transport drugs and money, was found guilty of possession with intent to supply controlled drugs. The court heard the drugs were shipped in from Holland at an import price of £2,200 per kilogram. The gang then sold the cannabis on to regional distributors at a UK wholesale price of £3,400 per kilogram, with 20-50kg being sold at a time. Mr Cray said regional distributors like Alexander charged £3,550 to £3,575 per kilogram. Mr Cray said although he was further down the hierarchy, Alexander was still a "prolific drug dealer at a regional level in the High Wycombe area".
He said a "typical deal" would be for Alexander to take 40kg of skunk worth £136,000 and sell it on for a profit of £6,000-£7,000. The hearing was adjourned to tomorrow when the men will be sentenced.

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Nasser Hussain was told by a judge that he had added to the heroin problem in Middlesbrough


Nasser Hussain was told by a judge that he had added to the heroin problem in Middlesbrough with his illegal activities last summer. Hussain – also jailed in 2008 for dealing in Class A drugs – was described by his barrister as a gopher at the bottom of the food chain. He was said to have sold heroin on the streets to fund his own addiction, and did not make vast profits or lead a luxury lifestyle. Hussain supplied an undercover officer with a total of ten £5 deals during a fortnight last July, Teesside Crown Court heard yesterday. Sharon Elves, prosecuting, told the court the 33-year-old father also offered to get the detective crack cocaine on two occasions. Paul Cleasby, mitigating, said Hussain got involved in taking drugs when he “reacted badly to an unfortunate event in his family”. He said: “He knows he only has himself to blame, and it fills him with shame that he has let down his family, his long-term partner of 19 years and his children, who are now all teenagers.” Hussain, of Jefferson Street, Middlesbrough, admitted eight charges of supplying Class A drugs and two of offering to supply. Jailing him for three years and three months, Recorder William Hirst told him: “This is more serious because you have a recent conviction for similar offences.” Mr Cleasby told the court: “He leads a meagre existence. There is no suggestion he has enjoyed the trappings of high living. “He is an uncomplicated offender at the bottom of the chain of offenders of this type. He is a gopher at the bottom of the food chain

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Monday, March 22

234 foreigners were nabbed for drug offences in 2007, followed by 313 in 2008 and 502 last year

234 foreigners were nabbed for drug offences in 2007, followed by 313 in 2008 and 502 last year.Within a two-year span, the number of such arrests had more than doubled.
City police Narcotics Department chief ACP Kang Chez Chiang said some visitors were taking advantage of the government's policy to boost tourism by bringing in drugs illegally.

"There are also foreigners who abuse their student visas to smuggle drugs," he said.


"Although this is a worrying trend, the increasing number of arrests for this offence shows police are able to curb the problem to a certain extent, with help from intelligence here and abroad."Kang said police were working closely with their counterparts in neighbouring countries.
"In order for us to keep a check on drug smuggling, there is a need to share information on suspects and new tactics by smugglers."
Of the 502 arrested last year, Indonesians led the pack with 192, followed by those from Myanmar (162), China (27), Thailand (24) and Iran (23). The remaining 74 comprised nationals from 12 other countries.Of last year's total, 47 were arrested under Section 39B of the Dangerous Drug Act which carries the mandatory death sentence upon conviction. This means almost one in 10 arrested had smuggled drugs in considerable quantities.Kang said high on the list of demands were synthetic drugs, such as syabu. Last year, 22.84kg of syabu with a street value of RM913,000 was seized. This is more than double the 10.35kg valued at RM414,000 seized in 2008.
Most of the foreigners arrested were men aged between 30 and 39 years.
A total of 209 men and 25 women were arrested in 2007, 281 men and 32 women in 2008 and 447 men and 55 women last year.Kang said stricter checks at entry points into the country would help deter visitors from smuggling illegal substance.

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Marvin Mosley, 35, could face up to 20 years in state prison

Marvin Mosley, 35, could face up to 20 years in state prison and a fine of up to $200,000 if he were to be found guilty of first-degree possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute, according to the Office of the Attorney General. Executing a warrant, law enforcement agencies searched Mosley's home in the 600 block of Randolph Street in Camden on July 6, and detectives found drugs stashed in an upstairs bathroom toilet, authorities said. A kilogram of powder cocaine was wrapped in a plastic bag, and about 4.5 ounces of crack cocaine was hidden in a knotted sandwich bag, officials said.

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Monday, March 15

arrested are Sara Chikwasa, 40, a resident of Kabinga in Ndola and Alice Sandi Mulonda, 39, a resident of Matero in Lusaka

Emmy Nawale, 28, a resident of Lubuto, Ndola was arrested on arrival aboard an Ethiopian Airline flight.“Ms Nawale, who inserted a block of cocaine in her private parts was operated upon at the University Teaching Hospital to remove the contraband as it was dangerously inserted,” he said.Mr Nyawali said Ms Nawale is admitted to hospital and will appear in court soon.“Others arrested are Sara Chikwasa, 40, a resident of Kabinga in Ndola and Alice Sandi Mulonda, 39, a resident of Matero in Lusaka,” he said.Mr Nyawali said the two, who were on a Kenyan Airways flight, also inserted the cocaine in their private parts.He said this brings the number of women arrested at Lusaka International Airport for drug trafficking in the last seven days to four.“The Commission is saddened with the emerging trend of drug trafficking as it is degrading to the dignity of women in our society,” Mr Nyawali said.Meanwhile, Mr Nyawali said 94 people were arrested across the country for trafficking in cannabis with a total weight of two tonnes.

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Friday, March 12

Allan Johnston was jailed for three years by Teesside Crown Court


Cocaine dealer Allan Johnston was jailed for three years by Teesside Crown Court last November after police caught him with drugs worth more than £2,000 in a car in Hartlepool.He has now been ordered to pay back £850 after prosecutors used their powers under the Proceeds of Crime Act.Johnston, 37, did not fight the application to claw back his ill-gotten gains and agreed to the confiscation order.They arrived at the sum of £850 after examining his financial records to calculate how much of his assets could be recovered.He jailed after he was caught with a fist-sized package of cocaine weighing 55 grams on February 13 last year.Johnston, who was in the car with his partner, was pulled over by police in Park Road, Hartlepool, shortly after officers saw him in a pub car park.
He offered up the drugs when they asked if there was anything in the car that should not be there.The cocaine was found to be of poor quality at seven per cent pure.
But it had a street value of up to £2,770 and the court heard that between November 2008 and February last year he was a street dealer.The court heard that during that time Johnston, of Masefield Road, Hartlepool, raked in around £300 a week.Scales, £590 and mobile phones were seized when officers later searched his home.
He admitted possession of a Class A drug with intent to supply and also possession of a number of diazepam tablets which were for his personal use.

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convicted 40-year-old Domingo Baez and two co-defendants — 30-year-old Maurisio Ramirez and 32-year-old Gilberto Acevedo,

convicted 40-year-old Domingo Baez and two co-defendants — 30-year-old Maurisio Ramirez and 32-year-old Gilberto Acevedo, both of Wenatchee, Wash. — of conspiracy to distribute cocaine.The jury found that the men conspired to bring between approximately a pound and 11 pounds of the drug to the Billings area between January 2007 and September 2008. They face a minimum mandatory sentence of five to 40 years in prison and up to a $2 million fine.Eddleman and Kurth acknowledged giving cocaine to friends at parties in their Red Lodge and Billings homes.Kurth is serving an eight-month sentence, and Eddleman was sentenced to 2½ years.

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arrested 51-year old Peter Achim Franz

arrested 51-year old Peter Achim Franz suspicious of the man's insecure actions upon his arrival at the airport at 7.30 p.m. flying from Amsterdam on flight number KL 835."We became suspicious as he showed signs of drug taking," Bagus Endro Wibowo said.Officials scanned him and found a small plastic bag containing marijuana placed in his underwear."By using the Ion scan, we also detected traces of cocaine on his hands and bag. The suspect admitted that he consumed cocaine a day before flying to Bali," Wibowo explained.The suspect could be charged with violating a law on narcotics, with a possible sentence of between five and 20 years in prison."The case has been submitted to the Bali Police for further investigation," Wibowo said.
Sr. Com. Kokot Indarto, director of Bali Police's narcotics department, confirmed that he had received the report and was processing the case."We are examining evidence at the Forensic Laboratory."Indarto admitted that the number of drug trafficking and smuggling involving foreign nationals had been increasing significantly over the last few months.Since December 2009, the Bali Police has handled drug-related cases involving seven Iranian citizens who were found to have illegally smuggled 5 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine by swallowing the drug.Ten days later, another Iranian was arrested for illegally trafficking similar drugs using the same modus operandi.Also in December, Australian Robert Paul Mcjannett was caught smuggling 2 grams of marijuana.On new year's eve, a Ngurah Rai official also arrested Malaysian Hoon Yue Chin for smuggling 0.62 grams of crystal meth.In early January, Ngurah Rai officials also arrested a French man for smuggling 0.78 grams of heroin.In the same month, two Malaysian citizens, Chang Cheng Weng and Boo Guang Teik, smuggled 2 kilograms of crystal meth.The last case involved an Indian national Mohamed Umar charged with smuggling 9.8 kilograms of ketamine to Bali.

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Hugh Connolly and Mary Casey, both of Foxhole Road in Paignton, were arrested during police raids

Hugh Connolly and Mary Casey, both of Foxhole Road in Paignton, were arrested during police raids on Wednesday, the second day of Operation Blaze.Police hit five Paignton addresses this week as part of intelligence-led investigations, recovering heroin, pills, cash and mobile phones.Connolly and Casey were charged with supplying an undercover police officer with heroin.Five other drug dealers had pleaded guilty on Tuesday when they appeared before magistrates, and Connolly and Casey were arrested as part of the same raids.Connolly, 46, admitted three charges of supplying diamorphine, one charge of being concerned in supplying diamorphine, and one of offering to supply diamorphine.Casey, 36, pleaded guilty to supplying diamorphine.
Chris Bittlestone, prosecuting, said: "Heroin is a pernicious and present problem."
The court heard guideline sentencing for dealing heroin is between 18 months and two years.Mervyn Williams, mitigating, told the court he had no issue with what the prosecution had told magistrates.Connolly and Casey were remanded in custody to appear at Exeter Crown Court on April 6 for sentencing.Magistrates' chairman Ian Handford said the crimes were very serious and not to be treated lightly.

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Friday, March 5

Luigino Jonis (aged 33), Den Haag, Holland pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to possession of drugs for sale and supply

Luigino Jonis (aged 33), Den Haag, Holland pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to possession of drugs for sale and supply at the airport on March 9, 2009.
Father-of-four Jonis had flown to Dublin from Johannesburg via Istanbul with 24 kilograms of cannabis in his luggage when he was intercepted by airport customs officials.Garda Keith Morris told Ms Elva Duffy, prosecuting, that shortly after one o’clock he arrived at the customs hall in Dublin airport where an examination of Jonis’ luggage was under way. After passing through an x-ray machine, Jonis’ luggage was found to contain just over 24 kilogrammes of cannabis in a number of brown taped packages contained within two larger decoratively wrapped packages.Garda Morris said that Jonis admitted that he was carrying “grass” and indicated that he had been offered between two and three thousand euro to transport drugs into the country.
He said that Jonis told gardaí that he owed over €8,000 to different banks and for his children’s education in Holland, and had agreed to smuggle the drugs as he “wanted to succeed at something”. Jonis told gardaí that he thought he was carrying three kilograms of cannabis and was unaware that he was actually transporting a significantly larger amount. Garda Morris told Ms Mary Rose Gearty SC, defending, that after making admissions to customs officials, Jonis became very upset and was very worried by the whole situation.Garda Morris accepted that Jonis was financially desperate and that he was not at the very highest end of the scale of drug traffickers.He accepted that Jonis had shown genuine remorse for his actions and was as cooperative as he could have been with both gardaí and customs officials.
Ms Gearty told the court that Jonis was a person of a very industrious nature, who had an extensive CV and had no previous convictions in his native Holland. She said that the incident painted a picture of a man who was clearly desperate and that Jonis had since done everything within his power to mitigate his circumstances.She said that Jonis was subject to racial abuse in prison and that he was currently without the support of his family who could not travel from Holland to visit him.
Judge Tony Hunt said that he agreed that Jonis was at the lower end of the scale of drug traffickers and that he had couriered drugs out of financial desperation. However, he said that Jonis had still couriered a significant amount of cannabis.
Judge Hunt said it was unfortunate that he encountered similar situations almost every day of the week, whereby foreign nationals with financial difficulties were preyed upon by people in the higher echelons of the drugs trade.He said he was taking into account the particular difficulties Jonis encountered serving a prison sentence in an Irish jail and imposed a six year sentence with the final two years suspended provided that Jonis departure the jurisdiction immediately upon completion of the remainder of his sentence.

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hundred kilos of heroin with an estimated street value of £4.5million has been seized by police in Finsbury Park.

hundred kilos of heroin with an estimated street value of £4.5million has been seized by police in Finsbury Park.The heroin was discovered in the back of a Renault van, stopped by officers in Upper Tollington Park, at 3.30pm on Thursday.The stop, which was part of a planned operation, was carried out by Operation Trident officers with the assistance of armed officers from C019.A 45-year-old man was arrested in the van. Another man, also aged 45, and a 38-year-old woman were arrested a short time later in Seven Sisters Road, Holloway.
All are currently in custody at east London police stations and enquiries continue.
Detective Inspector Malcolm Davies, from Operation Trident, which deals with black on black gun crime, said: "This is a major seizure and will severely disrupt the organised criminal networks in north east London. The offence of drug trafficking is a pernicious crime that directly impacts on the public of London. This seizure and arrests demonstrates SCD8's commitment to disrupting and dismantling major organised crime networks in London.

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Terrence Bowler led the £62 million syndicate which brought the drugs into the UK hidden in boxes of flowers from the Netherlands.


Terrence Bowler led the £62 million syndicate which brought the drugs into the UK hidden in boxes of flowers from the Netherlands.
He will be sentenced, along with 11 others, at Southwark Crown Court in London for his leading role in one of Britain's biggest drugs smuggling networks.
At one point, the gang was shipping in consignments worth up to £750,000 a week and would use an east London bureau de change to clean up its "dirty" profits. A 14-month undercover investigation found that the drugs were imported into the UK through Harwich ferry port in Essex and taken to a warehouse in Chatham, Kent. But officers at the port intercepted a shipment of 494lb (224kg), worth more than £750,000 to the gang, on July 16 2008, prompting a major change in tactics.
From September 2008, the drugs were shipped to Hull and taken to a warehouse in Leeds, West Yorkshire, before being transported to one of a number of lock-up garages in Kingston, Worcester Park, Epsom and Ashtead, where the skunk cannabis would be unpacked and stored.
Along with Bowler, who led the gang's so-called board of directors, 11 others now face jail in connection with the network.
Bowler, 40, of St Albans Road, Kingston, Surrey, Peter Moran, 37, of Fulham Palace Road, Fulham, west London; and Mark Kinnimont, 40, of Claremont Road, Surbiton, Surrey, made up the board of directors and all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime.
Liam Salter, David Couchman and Timothy Sullivan represented the next level of authority. Salter, 39, of Reeds Rest Lane, Tadworth, Surrey, Couchman, 38, of Sweeney Crescent, Southwark, south London, and Sullivan, 38, of Ash Court, Epsom, Surrey, all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supply controlled drugs and conspiracy to launder the proceeds of crime.
Asim Bashir, 35, of The Drive, Ilford, Essex, made sure that the drug money was included with legitimate cash and laundered through the financial system. He was convicted of laundering the proceeds of crime.
Details of the case can only now be reported for the first time due to legal reasons. All the convicted defendants will be sentenced "within two or three weeks", the judge said.

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American Pain a ``pill mill.''

American Pain a ``pill mill.'' But the Lake Worth pain clinic operated more like a factory, churning through 250 patients a day, paying doctors as much as $44,000 a week, and distributing more than two million painkillers in a single year.Those details are contained in a forfeiture lawsuit the U.S. attorney's office filed this week seeking to seize three houses from American Pain's owner, Christopher George. The suit was filed Wednesday, the same day federal agents and local sheriff's deputies raided American Pain and two other clinics operated by George's twin brother, Jeffrey.American Pain is only one of as many as 200 loosely regulated pain clinics now operating in South Florida, making the region the chief supplier of black-market pills for much of the eastern United States. The explosion of clinics -- and the coinciding spike in prescription overdose deaths in the state -- has prompted lawmakers and law enforcement to begin cracking down on the industry.In the suit, prosecutors said George has been under investigation on suspicion of drug trafficking and money laundering for 18 months. Investigators said George tried to conceal his role as American Pain's owner by listing his mother and girlfriend as ``straw owners'' on corporate records. But George, 29, of Royal Palm Beach, has not been charged with any crimes.The suit describes American Pain as a massive -- and massively lucrative -- enterprise, attracting 250 patients a day from Kentucky, Ohio and South Carolina to buy painkillers. Prosecutors described the patients as mules in a drug-running circuit throughout the South: Out-of-state couriers could buy one pill of the painkiller oxycodone at American Pain for $5, and resell the narcotics in their home states for as much as $80 a pill, the suit says.Investigators tracked 147 cash deposits totaling more than $14 million that flowed through American Pain's bank accounts in 2009 alone. A George associate told an undercover agent that George was trying to launder as much as $40 million in assets, the suit says.Neither George nor his lawyer, James Eisenberg, could be reached for comment Thursday. But Eisenberg previously has said that the George brothers broke no laws while running their businesses.The pain-clinic business was also generous to the five doctors who worked at American Pain: Dr. Cynthia Cadet of Fort Lauderdale; Dr. Jacob Dreszer of Hollywood; Dr. Roni Dreszer of Hollywood; Dr. Michael Aruta of Boca Raton; and Dr. Beau Boshers of Palm Beach Gardens. Combined, they received $5.1 million in payments last year for providing exams and writing prescriptions at the clinic, prosecutors say.
These five doctors ordered more than 2.1 million oxycodone pills in 2009 through American Pain, prosecutors say. All five physicians are among the top 20 doctors who dispensed the most oxycodone in the United States last year, the suit says, citing DEA data.Prosecutors said they were reviewing allegations that the doctors were paid based on the number of patients they saw. The doctors were not paid employees of the clinic, but were paid as independent contractors, the suit says.None of the five doctors has ever been disciplined by the state medical board, records show. No doctor would comment for this story.
``There's an ongoing investigation. I can't answer those questions,'' Boshers told The Miami Herald on Thursday. According to the government's lawsuit, he ordered 439,599 oxycodone pills in 2009 through American Pain, which paid him $1.2 million.

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Wayne Coleiro, 38, of Bryony Close, Walkden, was jailed for two-and-a-half years.Matthew Neale, 38, of Halton Bank, Irlam, was given seven years

Wayne Coleiro, 38, of Bryony Close, Walkden, was jailed for two-and-a-half years.Matthew Neale, 38, of Halton Bank, Irlam, was given seven years behind bars have been brought to justice after police smashed a huge cocaine supply network.
The men were part of a group of nine, who all admitted conspiracy to supply class A drugs, were caught following a major undercover operation.The gang was caught red-handed last March when cops found two kilos of cocaine and a blender to ‘cut’ the drug at a house in Miles Platting, Manchester.After they were jailed, Detective Chief Inspector John Ogden, of the Serious Crime Division of Greater Manchester Police, said: "Our investigation unearthed a lucrative and widespread criminal network involved in selling drugs."We have smashed a major drugs ring by disrupting the supply of lethal drugs on to our streets and it is very pleasing to see the main players behind bars."We targeted this ring because GMP is committed to clamping down on the illicit trade of drugs and I hope these sentences act as a warning to anyone who is currently involved in drug-related activity or who may be considering becoming involved in it."

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Monday, March 1

Royston Wellington of Hadfield Street remanded to prison when he appeared before her for allegedly being found with a quantity of cocaine

Royston Wellington of Hadfield Street remanded to prison when he appeared before her for allegedly being found with a quantity of cocaine in his possession for the purpose of trafficking.He entered a not guilty plea to the charge of possession of narcotics for the purpose of trafficking when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrate’s Court.He denied that on February 23 at East La Penitence he had eight grammes of cocaine in his possession for the purpose of trafficking.He was represented by attorney-at-law Sasha Roberts who applied for bail on the grounds that he had a medical condition that may deteriorate if incarcerated without receiving his medication.However, the magistrate informed her that that was not a special reason for bail to be granted to her client in a matter of this nature.Prosecutor Joel Ricknauth then requested that Wellington be remanded to prison and a date be set for the commencement of his trial.

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Jason L. Davidson, 26, of 53 1/2 Harrison St., Greenville, had charges held for disorderly conduct and furnishing drug-free urine

Jason L. Davidson, 26, of 53 1/2 Harrison St., Greenville, had charges held for disorderly conduct and furnishing drug-free urine before District Judge Lorinda L. Hinch, Mercer.State parole agents brought Davidson to the Mercer police station in handcuffs after they found the small bottle tied to a string in his sweatpants, Mercer police said.The urine was in case Davidson had to take a urine test, he told police.
While being brought to the station, he became unruly and had to be told not to yell and swear in public, police said.

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Sentenced Walter Taylor, age 28, of Baltimore today to 210 months in prison

Sentenced Walter Taylor, age 28, of Baltimore today to 210 months in prison, followed by five years of supervised release, for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute heroin. The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy; Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III; and Special Agent in Charge Richard A. McFeely of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. According to Taylor’s guilty plea, from 2004 until July 2008, he was a street level distributor in a drug organization that sold heroin under the brand name “Dynasty” in the Westport section of Baltimore City. During the period of the conspiracy, Taylor was observed by law enforcement in and around the “street shop,” distributing heroin to customers. Taylor admits that he and the other members of the organization conspired to distribute at least 30 kilograms of heroin. United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein thanked Baltimore City Assistant State’s Attorney Keri Borzilleri for her assistance in the investigation and prosecution. Mr. Rosenstein commended Assistant United States Attorney James T. Wallner and Special Assistant United States Attorney Christopher M. Mason, a cross-designated Baltimore City Assistant State’s Attorney assigned to EXILE cases, who are prosecuting the case.

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Steven P. Guzman, 24, was seen in the parking lot of a Dunkin’ Donuts on Lakeville Road where he agreed to sell the bags


Steven P. Guzman, 24, was seen in the parking lot of a Dunkin’ Donuts on Lakeville Road where he agreed to sell the bags to another person for an unknown amount of money at 9:07 p.m., according to Narcotics/Vice Bureau detectives.
He was found to have 102 bags of heroin on him, each bag marked “Coming Up,” police said.Guzman was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance and criminal sale of a controlled substance. He will be arraigned at First Distrcit Court in Hempstead on Sunday.

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Kristin Metz, 29, had faced a possible life term in the 2008 murder of Stevie May.

Kristin Metz, 29, had faced a possible life term in the 2008 murder of Stevie May. The lesser sentence resulted from an agreement between prosecutors and Metz’ defense team that was approved by state District Judge Ray Wheless. No witnesses testified during the punishment phase.As part of the deal, the defense waived the right to appeal."It was a fair sentence," said lead prosecutor John Lee Schomburger. "There was not any intent to kill."Defense attorney Tom D'Amore said he also was pleased with the sentence: "It was done...to avoid the risk to our client of a greater sentence."A Collin County jury found her guilty Friday of causing May’s death by injecting her with heroin at her request.The verdict in the unusual trial came moments before state District Judge Ray Wheless was about to send the panel home for the weekend. When the verdict was announced, May's mother, Kathleen May, sobbed openly in the courtroom.A few feet away, Metz, 29, appeared calm. But she broke down in tears moments later as her attorney, Scott Palmer, sought to reassure her.
"How could they do this?" she pleaded. "How do I have any faith in justice?"
The case against Metz was considered a rarity because she was charged with murdering someone who authorities acknowledge was voluntarily committing the same criminal act: possession of heroin.Evidence at the trial shows that at the behest of May, Metz purchased heroin from a Carrollton dealer so they both could use it back at the McKinney apartment Metz shared with her husband. But when May had trouble injecting herself, Metz — her best friend — did it for her, authorities say. The 21-year-old mother died inside Metz's apartment.

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Balwant Nagra, 29, had pled guilty earlier in Sarnia court to importing cocaine

Balwant Nagra, 29, had pled guilty earlier in Sarnia court to importing cocaine on Aug. 6, 2007.Through an interpreter, Nagra pleaded for a lesser sentence so he could stay with his family. He is married with a young child, who could be heard crying throughout the proceedings.When the sentence was announced, a female family member collapsed on the courtroom floor. She was taken to hospital with chest pains.
Justice Mark Hornblower said seven years was an appropriate sentence, even if the vulnerable Nagra was preyed upon by sophisticated commercial drug traffickers.
Hornblower quoted an appeal court judgment setting sentencing guidelines for cocaine smuggling at seven to 10 years for first offences.Untold misery results from hard drug use, Hornblower said.Nagra, who had no prior criminal record, came to Canada to make a better life for himself, and appears to have been successful until the cocaine smuggling, Hornblower said.U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency officers notified Canadian authorities to watch for Nagra's truck after a cocaine shipment was tracked electronically from California to Detroit. The DEA alert was part of an international investigation code-named E-Paragon.DEA agents planted the tracking device after watching cocaine being added to a truckload of plums in California.In Michigan, two plum boxes holding 33 packages of cocaine were transferred to Nagra's truck before he crossed the Blue Water Bridge.After seizing the drugs, Canadian authorities released Nagra without charges so that E-Paragon could continue. He then drove Canadian routes only.Nagra was charged in November 2008 when the operation ended with multiple arrests in British Columbia.The investigation revealed Canadian marijuana and chemicals used in methamphetamine production were being traded for cocaine in a cross-border drug swap.Federal prosecutor Michael Robb said outside the courtroom there's a market for Canadian marijuana in California, and some chemicals are easier to obtain in Canada.
Toronto-based defence lawyer John Norris said Nagra viewed drug running as an easy way to escape financial problems, but is now heavy with remorse.Nagra wrung his hands and wept during sentencing.He was offered $10,000 to cross the border with the cocaine.Courier fees normally range from $500 to $1,000 per kilogram, with $1,000 the more common fee, said Robb.A report filed with the court estimate the cocaine's value at $1 million to $2.6 million, depending on how it would have been sold.

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Chris Houston, who plays for Newcastle Knights in the National Rugby League competition, has been charged with supplying ecstasy and cocaine


Chris Houston, who plays for Newcastle Knights in the National Rugby League competition, has been charged with supplying ecstasy and cocaine according to reports in Australian newspapers on Monday.
The 25-year-old second-row forward will appear in court next month, and has been suspended by his club.
"Newcastle Knights player Chris Houston has been stood down immediately and indefinitely following reports he was charged this afternoon on drug-related allegations," a Knights statement said on Monday.
Houston's teammate Danny Wicks was charged with six counts of supplying prohibited drugs and two counts of drug possession in December.
Wicks' younger brother and his sister-in-law have also been charged as part of a police investigation into drugs suppliers, along with soccer player Steven Stefanovski.
Wicks and Houston both moved to Newcastle from Sydney club St George Illawarra at the end of 2007.
Wicks agreed to cancel his $180,000-a-year contract in December, the Sydney Morning Herald reported, while Houston is contracted to the Knights until 2012.
It is the second year in a row that the sport has been hit by controversy ahead of a new season, which begins in two weeks.
Last year, Manly and Australia fullback Brett Stewart had to be removed from NRL advertisements following allegations of sexual assault.
Former Newcastle and Australia star Andrew Johns also made headlines after his retirement in 2007 when he was caught in possession of ecstasy in Britain, and later admitted he had been a regular user of the drug during his career.

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