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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Saturday, February 27

Paul Grafton had a £160,000 house, changed his car 16 times in nine years and flew to Las Vegas with his wife to watch a boxing contest.

Grafton, 33, collected more than £20,000 in a range of benefits by claiming to be a single man, living alone, and out of work.The reality was that he was living with his wife and their daughter in relative luxury – mostly funded by his law-breaking.
Police first investigated the benefit fraud and charged both Grafton and his wife, Joanne Dickson, 31, in January last year.During surveillance, detectives noted that he frequently visited a fishing cabin in Redcar, east Cleveland, with other men.
The cabin – along with the Middlesbrough homes of Grafton and an associate, David Foy – were searched for drugs.Almost £600 worth of cocaine and £555 in cash was found at Foy’s house in Millbrook Avenue during the raid on January 9.It later emerged that he allowed Grafton to use his home to store drugs, and split them from bulk deals into smaller packages.Both men admitted a charge of possessing Class A drugs with intent to supply when they were due to go on trial.Grafton also admitted a number of benefit fraud offences, but ultimately no evidence was offered against his wife.However, a judge told her: “Anybody with any commonsense could see you have come within a whisker of being convicted.”Recorder David Wilby, locked up Grafton, of Eastbourne Gardens, for a total of four years, and sentenced Foy to 21 months.Foy also admitted a common assault and an assault occasioning actual bodily harm against his then-partner last November.Last night, Cleveland Police hailed the success of their Operation Weller, and the Too Much Bling, Give us A Ring campaign.Inspector Dave Turnbull, of the force’s economic crime unit, said: “The residents of communities in Teesside know who the drug dealers and criminals are.
“Every day they see them flaunting their wealth. Most do not work – yet can afford designer clothes, the latest electrical goods and have overseas holidays while claiming benefits.“The Too Much Bling campaign that ran in 2008 was aimed at encouraging the public to report people who they suspected were committing crime and who appeared to be living beyond their means.
“As a result, a lot of intelligence including information on Grafton was received.
“The economic crime unit money laundering team found evidence that Grafton was cheating the benefit system and was supplying controlled drugs that was funding an extravagant lifestyle.”
Brian Russell, for Grafton, said he had also funded his lifestyle by “reckless borrowing” on credit cards and loans from people.
Paul Newcombe, for Foy, said: “Facing the prospect of going to prison for the first time in his life is daunting.”

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Thursday, February 25

Michael Daly, 49, teamed up with a police killer to smuggle in £235million worth of the drug in an inflatable boat.

Michael Daly, 49, teamed up with a police killer to smuggle in £235million worth of the drug in an inflatable boat.
But the bungling smugglers recruited by Daly and murderer Perry Wharrie overloaded the vessel and filled the spare tank with diesel instead of petrol.
It capsized in a storm, spilling 62 bales of high-quality cocaine into the sea. Two gang members swam ashore and the other was hauled to safety by a helicopter.
Millionaire crook Daly is already serving eight years for an almost identical crime aimed at landing £4million worth of cocaine on a beach in Kent.
He turned to high-stakes crime after being dismissed from the Metropolitan Police for drink-driving.
Using his Scotland Yard experience, he built a drugs empire, investing the proceeds in property in Britain and Ireland. Investigators found £30,000 of his in a safety deposit box in London store Harrods.
Daly went into partnership with Wharrie, 50, jailed for life in 1989 for the murder of off-duty PC Frank Mason. He was released in 2005.
Blackfriars Crown Court in London yesterday heard how the gang had planned to get rich like “high-stakes gamblers at the Casino Royale”, sailing the drugs from the Caribbean to a rendezvous with the smugglers off the Irish coast.
The drugs left Barbados in May 2007 on a catamaran called Lucky Day but the transfer was sunk by bad luck, bad weather and bungling.
A joint investigation in Britain and Ireland has resulted in convictions for six of the gang.
Martin Wanden, the former detective’s brother Joe Daly and Wharrie were convicted in Ireland, while another member, Gerard Hagan, pleaded guilty.

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federal grand jury indictment alleges Michael Olsen, 35, of Milton, ran the drug ring involving over 5 kilograms of cocaine and 5 grams of crack from

federal grand jury indictment alleges Michael Olsen, 35, of Milton, ran the drug ring involving over 5 kilograms of cocaine and 5 grams of crack from out of Rizzo Bros. auto detailing shop, which did little legitimate business, the office of the U.S. Attorney for Vermont said.
Olsen is accused of directing others to mail cash, usually over $20,000, to dealers in California and Arizona, who then had the cocaine sent to other locations in Vermont, where it was distributed, prosecutors said.
Andrew Bullock, 29, of Essex Junction; Matthew Rivers, 24, of South Burlington; Roddy Superneau, 45, of Colchester; Sonya Robar, 36, or Essex Junction; Joel Root, 36, of St. Albans; Melissa Root, 39, of St. Albans; and Jason Smith, 31, of Burlington are facing drug distribution charges.
Olsen, Allison Simpson, 38, of South Burlington and Melissa Stuart, 33, of Colchester are accused of money laundering in alleged schemes in which drug money was deposited into a business bank account from which paychecks were drawn and vehicles were purchased with drug proceeds and kept in other people’s names, prosecutor said.
Olsen and a telephone company employee also are charged with accessing phone records of Drug Enforcement Administration agents so that Olsen could determine which witnesses were talking with the DEA, the indictment said.

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Phuong Thi Tran, 39, of Mississauga, Ontario, "operated a network of smugglers who distributed large amounts of ecstasy" to drug dealers in the United

Phuong Thi Tran, 39, of Mississauga, Ontario, "operated a network of smugglers who distributed large amounts of ecstasy" to drug dealers in the United states.
Tran has been charged in Michigan as well as Pennsylvania. Her organization is accused of delivering 100,000 ecstasy pills to dealers in Philadelphia and Boston.Tran pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute ecstasy and methamphetamines and one count of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute ecstasy. The case was investigated by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the DEA, and other law enforcement agencies from both nations. Tran will be sentenced in June.

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Charlie Nunn, of the 300 block of Hill Street, allegedly grew the marijuana in a pair of specialty tents

Charlie Nunn, of the 300 block of Hill Street, allegedly grew the marijuana in a pair of specialty tents -- purchased from a company in Illinois called Big Grow Hydroponics -- in his garage with lights and heaters. Police said Nunn also had a .357 Magnum, multiple cell phones and a pair of brass knuckles.Police said they watched Nunn four months before raiding his home Monday. They had believed most of his illicit activity centered on selling heroin and syringes and were surprised to find the grow house, police said.
"It was just good police work," Bethlehem Detective Sgt. William Kissner said.
Bethlehem police say they seized these marijuana plants from the Hill Street home.
Police Commissioner Stuart Bedics said growing operations are not uncommon, but this one was unique.
"We've never seen this type of apparatus," Bedics said, gesturing to the tall, black and green tent that Nunn allegedly used to store and grow the marijuana plants.
Lt. Mark DiLuzio said the marijuana plants each produce 1 pound of marijuana with a total street value of $100,000 -- growers could harvest up to four times a year.
Nunn was charged with eight drug-related offenses and a weapons offense. He was sent to Northampton County Prison in lieu of $25,000 bail.Nunn was also involved in an alleged theft in Hellertown earlier this month in which two men took his girlfriend's backpack, police said. Nunn held onto the thieves' truck as they drove away, police said. He was thrown from the truck and treated for injuries.

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Angie Sanselmente Valencia who police believe may have run a drug trafficking operation using models and atttractive women.


30-year-old Angie Sanselmente Valencia who police believe may have run a drug trafficking operation using models and atttractive women.Miss Valencia is wanted for allegedly using a squad of women to transport cocaine from South America to Europe.Police say they discovered the operation when they arrested a 21-year-old woman carrying 55 kg of cocaine at Buenos Aires' Ezeiza Airport.Angie Valencia was crowned Colombia's Coffee Queen in 2000 and she is believed to live in Argentinalingerie model is believed to be the mastermind behind an all-women drug gang that smuggles cocaine into Britain. An international arrest warrant has been issued for Angie Sanselmente Valencia, 30, who is said to only hire glamour models to transport the drugs from South America to Europe.It’s believed that Colombian-born Valencia had been seeing a Mexican drug lord known as ‘The Monster’ but split with him at the end of last year to form her own cocaine-smuggling gang.She is said to describe the women working for her as ‘unsuspicious, beautiful angels’. The women are told to be ‘nice, but not flashy’.Valencia, who was crowned Colombia’s ‘Queen Of Coffee’ in 2000, left modelling and moved to Argentina late last year to establish her network.Her ‘angels’ were paid £3,200 for each trip they made and one of her gang is believed to have boarded a flight every 24 hours with the packages of cocaine.From Argentina they would fly up to the Mexican Caribbean resort of Cancun and from there they would smuggle them into Europe.However her network began to unravel several weeks ago when one of her ‘drug mules’ was caught at Argentina’s Ezeiza International Airport in Buenos Aires carrying 55kg of cocaine.The 21-year-old woman began to talk and within 12 hours police investigators had arrested a further three people.The drug mule had made no attempt to hide the cocaine in her suitcase because she’d been told no one would stop her at the airport, according to Argentine newspaper La Nacion.Police are now investigating the gang’s links to people working at the airport.
Following the arrests Valencia promptly disappeared from a four-star hotel in Buenos Aires but is still believed to be in the South American country.
She’d arrived from Mexico last December with her beloved pet Pomeranian dog. Investigators tried to trace her through the address to which the animal was registered but it only led them to an abandoned warehouse.

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Joseph Failazu, 32 and Yahye Ceefay, 25jailed for 12 years and fined €50,000 today after admitting in court to having imported nearly a kilo of drugs

Nigerian man was jailed for 12 years and fined €50,000 today after admitting in court to having imported nearly a kilo of drugs hidden in capsules in his stomach and his rectum.
In a similar case, a man from Gambia was jailed for 10 years and fined €20,000, after he admitted importing 250 grams hidden in capsules in his stomach.
Both men were arrested separately last August after flying i from Spain.
Chief Justice Vincent DeGaetano in handing down sentence said that the two accused, Joseph Failazu, 32 and Yahye Ceefay, 25, were part of a wider criminal organisation which had used them to achieve its ends, but they were well aware of what they were doing and the consequences of their actions.
The court, however, had noted their early guilty plea.

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Sunday, February 21

sentenced 25-year-old Raymond D. Wooley of Carbondale in United States District Court in Benton.

Wooley previously pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine. He will spend 11 years in federal prison.The violation took place between august 2006 and august 2008, in Jackson County. Two of Wooley's co-defendants have already been sentenced for their involvement in the crack cocaine conspiracy. Three more have pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

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David Redshaw, 38, of Crieff Walk in Hartlepool

David Redshaw, 38, of Crieff Walk in Hartlepool, pleaded guilty to throwing drugs into the Stockton jail on December 8 last year. He was due to be sentenced at Teesside Crown Court.

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Tuesday, February 9

Teodoro Garcia Simental was arrested by Mexican federal police without the suspect firing a shot, and immediately flown to Mexico City.

Teodoro Garcia Simental, blamed for a years-long campaign of massacres, beheadings and kidnappings that chased away tourists and caused social upheaval in northern Baja California, was arrested by Mexican federal police without the suspect firing a shot, and immediately flown to Mexico City.The heavyset Garcia, believed to be in his mid-30s, with close-trimmed hair and a goatee, scowled and dabbed at his mouth as he was paraded before television cameras at a police base wearing a zippered warm-up jacket.
Better known for savage killing rampages than narco-business acumen, the man nicknamed "El Teo" bedeviled Mexican authorities for years and narrowly escaped capture several times. Last January, authorities arrested the man they said admitted being Garcia's body disposal expert. Known as El Pozolero, or "the stew maker," he claimed, authorities said, to have dissolved 300 bodies in barrels of caustic chemicals.Mexican federal authorities, acting on intelligence provided by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, said they tracked Garcia down after a five-month surveillance operation. He was captured in an upscale area in the southern part of the city."Today another Mexican cartel leader was taken off the street and is no longer able to carry out his bloody turf war," said Michele Leonhart, acting administrator of the DEA. "This was not an isolated event: It exemplifies the growing effectiveness of our information sharing with [Mexican President Felipe Calderon's] administration, and our continued commitment to defeat the drug traffickers who have plagued both our nations."Though Garcia was not considered to be in the top echelon of Mexican drug lords, few reputed crime bosses have had such a ruinous effect on a region. Mexican authorities say he was responsible for hundreds of killings during a nearly two-year power struggle with rivals in the Arellano Felix drug cartel, in which he had once been a top-ranking lieutenant.Garcia is said to have branched out from traditional drug trafficking and focused his criminal empire on extortion and kidnapping, targeting all levels of society. During his reign, hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Tijuana residents moved out of the border city to avoid being kidnapped, and more than 42 police officers were killed.

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Spain have busted an international drug trafficking gang after arresting 48 members, most of them hailing from Tanzania.

Media reports say the gang distributed cocaine, heroin, hashish and narcotic pills from Asia and South America across Europe. The reports claim further that the gang used drug mules to bring the drugs into Spain.
The gang is said to be controlled by a couple based in Santander, and that most of those arrested are from Tanzania. Spanish police started investigations in May 2008 after an Argentinian man was arrested at Barcelona airport with over a kilo of cocaine in 72 pellets in his stomach.
A total of 43.5 kilogrammes of cocaine, 5.8kg of heroin and an unspecified amount of hashish were seized in the operation, and authorities said the arrested suspects will be slapped with charges ranging from conspiracy, drug trafficking, smuggling, forgery, and usurpation of civil status.
Reports from that country say the gang appears to be an organized network of mostly Tanzanian nationals, with horizontal structures and cells acting independently but in coordinated fashion, united by ties of kinship and fellow vendors who had settled in Argentina, Brazil, Greece and Turkey.
The gang is said to have taken advantage of ‘people from their own country’ and lured them with the promise of earning money, using them as mules to transport drugs hidden in their luggage or objects into Spain.
In August last year, the police arrested a member of the network as he was going to Valencia to carry out a transaction which involved half a kilo of heroin. Subsequently, the law enforcers arrested a Japanese man with 4.5 kilos of heroin in Barcelona.
And finally, in several homes in Barcelona the police arrested three people including the suspected head of the organization - a Tanzanian citizen - and a Spanish woman, both residents of Santander, from where they are believed to have led operations.
Contacted for comment late last week, the Deputy Director of Criminal Investigations in Tanzania, Peter Kivuyo said he was not aware of the reports but pledged to consult the international police (Interpol) for further details.

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Raydel Lopez Uriarte and Manuel Garcia Simental are believed to be top lieutenants in a cartel blamed for a string of massacres

Raydel Lopez Uriarte and Manuel Garcia Simental are believed to be top lieutenants in a cartel blamed for a string of massacres, police killings, beheadings and kidnappings in Tijuana.Two reputed leaders of a drug cartel that waged a years-long campaign of terror in Tijuana were arrested Monday in the Baja California port city of La Paz, according to U.S. authorities.Raydel Lopez Uriarte and Manuel Garcia Simental are believed to be top lieutenants of a gang blamed for a string of massacres, police killings, beheadings and kidnappings that has caused many residents to flee the border city.The arrests by Mexican federal police, coming a month after the capture of alleged cartel leader Teodoro Garcia Simental, are the latest blows against the gang. Authorities feared Lopez Uriarte and Manuel Garcia Simental, Teodoro's younger brother, were planning to reignite a gang war for control of Tijuana's drug trafficking routes.Lopez Uriarte was known for his narrow escapes and flair for self-promotion: His nickname, "Muletas," or crutches, stands for the trail of disabled people he's left behind, and he outfitted his crew with uniforms featuring a patch designed with a skull and crutches crossed underneath.
At least 1,400 people have been slain in Tijuana drug violence since the beginning of 2008.

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Smugglers caught in Sweden face 10 months in prison for smuggling 70 kilos of Khat

Smugglers caught in Sweden face 10 months in prison for smuggling 70 kilos of Khat while the same offense in Denmark only gives 30 days in the brig. Politicians are demanding harsher punishment.

Khat, also known as quaat, is a substance made from euphoria-inducing buds and is especially popular in Somalia. The substance is chewed to achieve a narcotic sense of bliss. Illegal in most countries khat is addictive and widely used within Somali communities in Denmark.

The Social Democrats are adamant that the punishments for khat related offences are too lax and need to be on the same level as those handed out in neighbouring Sweden.
‘The Øresund Bridge is too poorly manned on the Danish side, making it easy to smuggle drugs and weapons,’ said spokeswoman, Karen Hækkerup.‘And it doesn’t help that Khat smugglers receive such mild sentences in Denmark. The government must address this and we want to be a part of raising the punishment for Khat to equal that of Sweden,’ she added.Khat smuggling has been linked with the financing of the Somali terrorist organization, al-Shabaab and Berlingske newspaper recently established the importance of Denmark in the Khat smuggling industry. But Justice Minister Brian Mikkelsen was confident that the police were focused on khat smuggling and said he was strongly considering the prospects of stiffening the sentences handed down for smuggling the narcotic into Denmark. ‘I take a serious look at anything involved in the financing of terrorism and it’s a problem if money obtained from crime in Denmark is sent to Somalia and al-Shabaab since terrorism in Somalia has ramifications for western Europe. I don’t have any qualms about tougher punishments. Not only is it a criminal milieu, there is a lot of illegal money involved, and many families are devastated due to an addiction that forces them out of work and education. So hopefully we can toughen up the sentences in Denmark.’ said Mikkelsen.

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Matthew Feavyour was found guilty in September 2009 for his role in the importation of cannabis resin with an estimated street value of £270,000

Matthew Feavyour was found guilty in September 2009 for his role in the importation of cannabis resin with an estimated street value of £270,000 hidden in air conditioning units. Andrew Rickard and Gary Moore pleaded guilty at the start of the trial. Birmingham crown court sentenced the three men on February 4 for their conspiracy to supply the Class B drug cannabis. Detectives busted the gang's drug smuggling scam in 2009 following a lengthy police operation codenamed Stagnate. Police officers intercepted the consignment smuggled into the UK from the Netherlands on April 2009. The recovered drugs were concealed in eight boxes containing air conditioning unit access doors, which were specially constructed for the job. Some 380 'soap bar' blocks weighing 94.8kg in total were recovered.
Moore had ordered the manufacture of air conditioning units with hollow panels, where the cannabis could be hidden while transporting it from Holland.
Feavyour was sentenced to six years, Moore was sentenced to six-and-a-half years in jail and Rickard got four years for trafficking cannabis from Holland. Operation Oscilllate: Heroin smugglers jailed In a separate police operation (Operation Oscillate) two men have been jailed following an attempt to smuggle more than 1.5m worth of heroin into the UK by hiding it in the packaging of adiabatic air coolers. In July 2007, a consignment of class A drugs was intercepted by customs officers at Birmingham Airport. The heroin was concealed in the pallets carrying the coolers supplied by a Turkish firm and bound for a freight forwarding firm in the West Midlands. Thirty packages of heroin weighing almost 30kg were seized.
Each of the adiabatic air-coolers were valued at between £2,000-£5,000. The police recovered eight out of 19 units that came into the UK via the same route. Eleven units are still missing. Police say the units could have been dumped, sold for scrap or sold on. Two men were sentenced at Nottingham Crown court in December 2009 to 18 and 25 years for their part in the heroin smuggling. Police are still seeking a third man.

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Saika Marong and Mohamed Wissely holding them guilty under the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act.

Delhi court has awarded 10 years' rigorous imprisonment to two Nigerian nationals for possessing 400gm of cocaine and heroin in their tented premises in Madangir in 2005. "Convicts are involved in the trafficking of cocaine and heroin. Illegal trade of such a high quantity would have adverse impact on the lives of uncountable persons," special judge Sanjiv Jain said. The court also imposed a fine of Rs 1 lakh each on convicts Saika Marong and Mohamed Wissely holding them guilty under the Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act. A third accused, Roy Alphonse Chinguwile, was declared a proclaimed offender during the trial after he jumped the bail granted to him on the ground that he was suffering from cancer.

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Blair Dorner of Cameron ISD, 30 miles southeast of Temple, was pulled over Wednesday in Taylor, a town in Williamson County.

Blair Dorner of Cameron ISD, 30 miles southeast of Temple, was pulled over Wednesday in Taylor, a town in Williamson County.Cameron Superintendent Rodney Fausett tells News Channel 25, Dorner has been placed on administrative leave until their internal investigation is completed.The teacher is out of jail on a $11,000 bond.

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Police in Vantaa have uncovered one of the largest cocaine distribution rings in Finland


Police in Vantaa have uncovered one of the largest cocaine distribution rings in Finland. A total of fifteen suspects have been questioned during the investigations, five of whom are now in detention. One of the prime suspects is said to have trained restaurant security personnel. In addition to Finnish suspects, the ring includes nationals from Nigeria, Gambia, France and Syria. The gang is thought to have smuggled around 1.5 kilograms of cocaine last year. This is equivalent to some 86,000 doses with a street value of around 150,000 euros. Cocaine was packed into egg-sized containers which the smugglers had swallowed and then brought into the country. House searches led to the confiscation of narcotics from several locations amounting to 350 grams. Police say this is one of the largest ever seizures in Finland and equivalent to some 20,000 doses. However, they believe it only represents about ten percent of the overall consignment of cocaine. Security Trainer Is A Prime Suspect Among the prime suspects is a Finn involved in the security sector, who is believed to have acted as a wholesaler in the illicit dealing.
Police confiscated a large sum of cash from him along with cocaine and a 9 mm. Glock handgun of the type also used by law enforcers. He was involved in the licensed training of restaurant security personnel. The cocaine was sold in restaurants in the city centre of Helsinki and at partiesProsecutions are anticipated later this month.

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Benjimen G. Chaltry, 35; Jacob L. Martin, 26; and Robert J. Rogers, 31; were charged Monday with felony counts of possession of 10 to 50 grams

Benjimen G. Chaltry, 35; Jacob L. Martin, 26; and Robert J. Rogers, 31; were charged Monday with felony counts of possession of 10 to 50 grams of heroin with intent to deliver, which is punishable by up to 15 years in prison. All three remain in jail on cash bonds: $50,000 for Martin, $45,000 for Rogers and $30,000 for Chaltry.
“(Chaltry) was going to Chicago to purchase heroin that was then going to be sold in Marinette County,” Assistant District Attorney Joel Urmanski said while arguing for the high cash bonds. “It’s indicated this is not the first time there was a trip to Chicago to make a purchase.”According to Adams:Nelson was doing traffic enforcement on northbound Interstate 43 near the southern county line when he noticed a car with several equipment violations and two occupants not wearing seatbelts. He then discovered the driver, Chaltry, had a revoked license.After Martin lied about his name, Nelson searched the car and its occupants. The heroin was found in the car and in the passengers’ possessions, including 60 baggies that were stuffed in Rogers’ shoe.Adams said each of the baggies, called bindles, typically sells for $80 to $100.
All three men are also charged with misdemeanor cocaine possession, and Martin and Rogers are charged with misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia. Martin also faces a count of obstructing an officer.Martin is wanted in Brown County, where a judge issued a warrant in June after he failed to appear on a charge of felony marijuana possession, online court records show.Rogers, who was strapped into his chair during a video court appearance from jail, is the only one of the three with a felony record, though all three have multiple misdemeanor convictions, according to court records. Rogers has been convicted of felony burglary and theft, as well as misdemeanors including damage to property, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia; Chaltry has three drunken driving convictions and one marijuana possession conviction; and Martin’s prior convictions include resisting an officer and possession of drug paraphernalia.

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Aaron Diaz, 31,and Steven Pedraza, 22, of Hartford, Conn., were both taken into custody Sunday, according to state police.

Aaron Diaz, 31,and Steven Pedraza, 22, of Hartford, Conn., were both taken into custody Sunday, according to state police.The incident began after State Police Trooper Brendhan Shugrue had stopped a 2009 Jeep Cherokee on Interstate 91 north of Exit 16 for a traffic violation, but later learned neither Diaz nor Pedraza had the authority to be driving the vehicle, according to state police.Diaz, the driver of the vehicle, had allegedly struggled with police as they attempted to arrest him and fled the scene on foot, according to state police. While running, Diaz allegedly threw a bag containing 500 bags of heroin, according to state police, which troopers recovered.With the assistance of a state police helicopter and search dogs, state police were eventually able to locate Diaz on Westfield Road and Hillside Avenue, and place him under arrest. He is facing charges of using a motor vehicle without authority, trafficking in heroin, a subsequent offense of possession of heroin with the intent to distribute, conspiracy to violate narcotic laws, assault and battery on a police officer and resisting arrest, according to state police.
Some area residents took notice of the circling police helicopter and troopers in their neighborhood during the manhunt."Not sure what is going on, but police said they are searching for someone and to stay inside our house. This neighborhood is not an area of Holyoke that usually has criminal activity," states Roosevelt Avenue resident Sandy Dias in an e-mail to abc40 and Fox 6 Sunday during the search.
Pedraza, who had been a passenger in the vehicle, had also been arrested for using a motor vehicle without authority and conspiracy to violate narcotics laws, according to state police.Both men had been held overnight at the Northampton State Police Barracks while awaiting arraignment in Holyoke District Court Monday.

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John Hill, Peter McLeod and Kevin O'Hagan were seized at Puerto Plata Airport airport as they tried to board two flights to London.

John Hill, Peter McLeod and Kevin O'Hagan were seized at Puerto Plata Airport airport as they tried to board two flights to London.Cops swooped on the trio following a tip-off from the Scottish Crime & Drug Enforcement Agency.Sources said the cocaine was destined for the Glasgow area.Colombian cocaine had a very high purity and it could have been bulked up into more than 100 kilos, netting up to £2.5million.Sources claim the trio were working for a serious organised crime group.Hill, 53, from Linlithgow, West Lothian, was booked to travel home on a Thomas Cook flight. McLeod, 25, and O'Hagan, 28, both from Glasgow, were due to return to the UK on a separate charter. Both flights were scheduled to arrive at London Gatwick Airport.Local cops had been told by the SCDEA to look out for the trio and they were snared after an x-ray machine detected 7.14 kilos of cocaine in a suitcase on February 1.The SCDEA's Allan Moffat said: "By the time this seizure hit Scotland's streets, it would have grown in volume."The purity would have decreased after dealers bulked it with adulterants - some of them dangerous substances in their own right."

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Friday, February 5

44-year-old Richard Crayton of Mosinee charged with the distribution of heroin

44-year-old Richard Crayton of Mosinee charged with the distribution of heroin, which resulted in the death of an individual from use of the substance. If convicted, Crayton faces a mandatory minimum penalty of twenty years in prison and a maximum penalty of life in prison.The charge against Crayton results from an investigation conducted by the Merrill Police Department. The prosecution of this case has been assigned to Assistant U.S. Attorney David Reinhard.

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Johnnie Stephens, 28, New Washington, as he left the Polaris Mall in Columbus.Troopers found 8.8 grams of heroin

Johnnie Stephens, 28, New Washington, as he left the Polaris Mall in Columbus.Troopers found 8.8 grams of heroin, valued at more than $1,200, and an additional 10 balloons of the drug in the vehicle.Officials say Stephens purchased the heroin from two Columbus-area drug runners who Delaware County detectives also arrested.The sellers had 85 balloons of heroin, a Toshiba laptop and $2,400 in cash. Officials say Stephens purchased the drugs from the two sellers and paid with cash and the laptop, which was likely stolen.Huron County Sheriff’s Sgt. Annette McLaughlin said her department has worked with other agencies for several months to track Stephen’s whereabouts.Stephens will face felony charges of possession of heroin in Delaware County after the highway patrol sends the substance to its lab for testing, McLaughlin said. The degree of the felony depends on the weight of the drug.Stephens has served time for similar drug offenses in the past and sells drugs to heroin users in the Willard and Plymouth areas, officials said.

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1970s teen idol Leif Garrett has been released from jail on a charge he carried heroin into a Los Angeles subway station.


1970s teen idol Leif Garrett has been released from jail on a charge he carried heroin into a Los Angeles subway station.Los Angeles County sheriff's spokesman Steve Whitmore says the actor and singer was arrested late Monday for heroin possession and released on bond Wednesday.Whitmore says the 48-year-old was shaking and sweating.Whitmore says Garrett denied having drugs at first and allowed them to search him, then acknowledged that he had black tar heroin in his shoe.Garrett has a history of drug use, including a 2006 arrest at another Los Angeles subway stop for having heroin.He is due back in court Feb. 24.It was not immediately clear if Garrett had an attorney

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Sheryl Cwele, wife of state security minister Siyabonga Cwele, is accused of conspiring with a Nigerian man to bring cocaine into South Africa

Sheryl Cwele, wife of state security minister Siyabonga Cwele, is accused of conspiring with a Nigerian man to bring cocaine into South Africa by enlisting young white women as mules to travel overseas to collect the drugs."I wish to categorically state that I never knowingly participated in any drug trafficking, conspiracy or incitement to deal in drugs as set out in the indictment or at all," Cwele said yesterday in a bail application filed with the provincial high court.
Cwele, a 50-year-old municipal director of health and community services, was arrested last week at her workplace. The Pietermaritzburg High Court has scheduled her bail hearing for Friday.Allegations of Cwele's drug trafficking surfaced last year after the arrest of Tessa Beetge, a South African woman caught in Brazil in June with cocaine worth almost $300,000 .Beetge's family told a South African newspaper last year that Cwele had offered to find a job for her friend and former neighbour Beetge, who is listed in the indictment.Cwele and Frank Nabolis, a Nigerian arrested last month, face charges of conspiring to traffic drugs between Turkey, South America and South Africa.Cwele's bail application said she met Nabolis through an acquaintance and agreed to help him recruit two white people to work for his company.

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Ian Stephens, 41, from Aliwal Road, Battersea Rise and husband and wife Elias Hajichambi, 39 and Sharan Hajichambi, 38, pleaded guilty to conspiracy

Ian Stephens, 41, from Aliwal Road, Battersea Rise and husband and wife Elias Hajichambi, 39 and Sharan Hajichambi, 38, from Cherrywood Lane, Morden all pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import Class A drugs.Successful businessman John Beaumont-Griffin, 47, from Winterdown Road, Esher pleaded not guilty to the same charge and two additional charges of supplying a Class A drug but was convicted on all three counts by a jury following a trial which concluded on Friday at Kingston Crown Court.
Ringleader Stephens was jailed for 10 years, Elias Hajichambi given five years and Sharan Hajichambi sentenced to two years. Beaumont-Griffin was jailed for four and half years.In addition, Beaumont-Griffin had his Aston Martin DB9, which was used to transport drugs, seized by police as it had been used in crime. Stephens also had his Cherokee Jeep confiscated.Detectives from SCIT were alerted to the conspiracy after customs officers intercepted a package destined for an address in Esher containing food items which had arrived on a British Airways flight from Guyana on April 23 last year.Two food tins containing Chinese sauce were X-rayed and drilled into and a white powder was discovered inside. The powder later turned out to be a kilogramme of cocaine with a street value of £100,000.Two days later a further package from Guyana containing two identical tins addressed to a flat in Thornton Heath were also intercepted. Inside the tins was a further kilo of cocaine.
An undercover officer posing as a delivery man for the courier company delivered the first package to Beaumont-Griffin at his Esher address which was under surveillance.He was later observed taking the package in his Aston Martin to the Hajichambi’s home in Morden before leaving. A short while later Stephens arrived in his Jeep to collect it.Stephens was arrested in his vehicle shortly after leaving the property and the drugs package recovered. Sharan Hajichambi and Beaumont-Griffin were both detained at their homes shortly after.When officers searched the Hajichambi’s home they discovered a plastic bag containing a Tupperware box with white powder, two sets of electronic scales, spoon and milk tablets.They also found “dealer lists”, £2,700 in cash in a bedside drawer and a further £360 in Sharan Hajichambi’s handbag.When officers searched Stephens' home they found electronic scales, clear bags, dealer lists and a bag containing crack cocaine. In addition they found a stab proof vest and Taser stun gun.Another stun gun and travel documents to Guyana in the name of a convicted drug smuggler were found in his Jeep. Cash invoices showed Stephens had recently had £3,000 worth of upgrades carried out on his vehicle despite the fact he was on state benefits.
A subsequent investigation identified a total of 19 packages coming into the UK from Guyana that are linked to the investigation. Financial records showed that since 2006, Stephens had transferred a total of £148,000 to Guyana.Detective Inspector Wendy Clay said following the case: “Stephens and his group had clearly been using the route from Guyana to Gatwick to bring in significant amounts of cocaine for their own selfish gain.“Surrey Police is committed to tackling head on the scourge of class A drugs and this case shows we will not tolerate their import, sale and supply.
“The professionalism of the officers involved in the covert operation helped halt this conspiracy in its tracks and should serve as a warning to other criminal gangs that we will use all methods at our disposal to bring those responsible for importing cocaine into the country to justice.
“In addition to the time they will serve in prison, both Stephens and Beaumont-Griffin have had their expensive cars taken away from them. This reinforces the message that crime doesn’t pay and if you use your vehicle whilst committing offences we will use the powers available to us to seize it.”Surrey Police will now seek a Confiscation Order under the Proceeds of Crime Act to seize any available assets any of the group may have.
Successful businessman John Beaumont-Griffin, 47, from Winterdown Road, Esher pleaded not guilty to the same charge and two additional charges of supplying a Class A drug but was convicted on all three counts by a jury following a trial which concluded on Friday at Kingston Crown Court.Ringleader Stephens was jailed for 10 years, Elias Hajichambi given five years and Sharan Hajichambi sentenced to two years. Beaumont-Griffin was jailed for four and half years.In addition,

Beaumont-Griffin had his Aston Martin DB9, which was used to transport drugs, seized by police as it had been used in crime. Stephens also had his Cherokee Jeep confiscated.

Detectives from SCIT were alerted to the conspiracy after customs officers intercepted a package destined for an address in Esher containing food items which had arrived on a British Airways flight from Guyana on April 23 last year.
Two food tins containing Chinese sauce were X-rayed and drilled into and a white powder was discovered inside. The powder later turned out to be a kilogramme of cocaine with a street value of £100,000.Two days later a further package from Guyana containing two identical tins addressed to a flat in Thornton Heath were also intercepted. Inside the tins was a further kilo of cocaine.An undercover officer posing as a delivery man for the courier company delivered the first package to Beaumont-Griffin at his Esher address which was under surveillance.
He was later observed taking the package in his Aston Martin to the Hajichambi’s home in Morden before leaving. A short while later Stephens arrived in his Jeep to collect it.Stephens was arrested in his vehicle shortly after leaving the property and the drugs package recovered. Sharan Hajichambi and Beaumont-Griffin were both detained at their homes shortly after.When officers searched the Hajichambi’s home they discovered a plastic bag containing a Tupperware box with white powder, two sets of electronic scales, spoon and milk tablets.They also found “dealer lists”, £2,700 in cash in a bedside drawer and a further £360 in Sharan Hajichambi’s handbag.When officers searched Stephens' home they found electronic scales, clear bags, dealer lists and a bag containing crack cocaine. In addition they found a stab proof vest and Taser stun gun.Another stun gun and travel documents to Guyana in the name of a convicted drug smuggler were found in his Jeep. Cash invoices showed Stephens had recently had £3,000 worth of upgrades carried out on his vehicle despite the fact he was on state benefits.A subsequent investigation identified a total of 19 packages coming into the UK from Guyana that are linked to the investigation. Financial records showed that since 2006, Stephens had transferred a total of £148,000 to Guyana.
Detective Inspector Wendy Clay said following the case: “Stephens and his group had clearly been using the route from Guyana to Gatwick to bring in significant amounts of cocaine for their own selfish gain.“Surrey Police is committed to tackling head on the scourge of class A drugs and this case shows we will not tolerate their import, sale and supply.
“The professionalism of the officers involved in the covert operation helped halt this conspiracy in its tracks and should serve as a warning to other criminal gangs that we will use all methods at our disposal to bring those responsible for importing cocaine into the country to justice.“In addition to the time they will serve in prison, both Stephens and Beaumont-Griffin have had their expensive cars taken away from them. This reinforces the message that crime doesn’t pay and if you use your vehicle whilst committing offences we will use the powers available to us to seize it.”
Surrey Police will now seek a Confiscation Order under the Proceeds of Crime Act to seize any available assets any of the group may have.

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Jamil Young, 25, and Brian Walker, 23, are the known proprietors of the home and have been implicated in the alleged drug-dealing enterprise

Jamil Young, 25, and Brian Walker, 23, are the known proprietors of the home and have been implicated in the alleged drug-dealing enterprise. Both were home at the time.James Peterson, 49, of Woods Edge Drive in Lewes was also arrested at the time.
The raid was the conclusion of three months of investigation by Delaware and Maryland Police concerning drug distribution in Sussex and Wicomico counties, police said.The three men arrested have been charged with trafficking in cocaine, possession with intent to deliver cocaine, manufacturing cocaine, maintaining a dwelling for the the purpose of keeping controlled substances as well as other relates charges. All were arraigned and remanded to Sussex Correctional Institute in lieu of being able to post bail.

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Susan Olsen, 51, was arrested on three counts of maintaining a drug trafficking place

Susan Olsen, 51, was arrested on three counts of maintaining a drug trafficking place, two counts of delivery of heroin near certain places, one count of party to delivery of heroin near certain places and one count each of possession with the intent to deliver heroin near certain places, conspiracy to commit possession with the intent to deliver heroin and possession of narcotics.Thomas Oakley, 53, was arrested on charges of maintaining a drug trafficking place, possession with the intent to deliver heroin, conspiracy to commit possession with the intent to deliver heroin and possession of drug paraphernalia.Steven Messner, 47, was arrested on charges of maintaining a drug trafficking place, delivery of heroin near certain places, deliver heroin near certain places, conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia.Officers from the Street Crimes Unit could not be reached for comment Tuesday night.
Oakley, 53, was arrested on charges of maintaining a drug trafficking place, possession with the intent to deliver heroin, conspiracy to commit possession with the intent to deliver heroin and possession of drug paraphernalia.Steven Messner, 47, was arrested on charges of maintaining a drug trafficking place, delivery of heroin near certain places, deliver heroin near certain places, conspiracy and possession of drug paraphernalia.Officers from the Street Crimes Unit could not be reached for comment Tuesday night.

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arrest warrant for 44-year-old Vernon V. Ellefson Jr. of Cheyenne.

Ellefson and a group of other men are accused of supplying the drugs that killed bull rider 21-year-old Bryan John Guthrie of Cheyenne last December and a Cheyenne woman last summer. On Monday, Downes ordered Ellefson's release to the custody of his daughter, Victoria Ellefson. She says he refused her request to go back to jail on Wednesday. Guthrie was the 2003 national junior bull riding champion.

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MATHEW Stokes's 71-game career is teetering after he was arrested on Wednesday morning and charged with drug trafficking

MATHEW Stokes's 71-game career is teetering after he was arrested on Wednesday morning and charged with drug trafficking over the alleged purchase of one gram of cocaine.The World Anti-Doping Agency penalty for trafficking is a minimum ban of four years and can be a lifetime suspension. If Stokes is to play again he needs the more serious of the two charges reduced or dropped.Legal sources indicated yesterday that while there are provisions for the reduction of the WADA ban in its code - up to 75 per cent of a suspension can be removed, for example, if an athlete offers up information that leads to the conviction of others - there would be little scope for Stokes to appeal.The 25-year-old has told police that he purchased the gram of cocaine on January 19 for friends visiting from the Northern Territory. A conviction for possession, rather than trafficking - especially out of competition - could mean he escapes WADA punishment.A spokesman from the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority told The Australian last night that the out-of-competition use or possession of stimulants is not prohibited under the World Anti-Doping Code.
Stokes travelled to Melbourne last night, ahead of today's legal meeting, with sources indicating that player and club were told on Wednesday to be confident that the trafficking charge could be dismissed. According to evidence Stokes gave to police, the cocaine was neither for his own use nor procured for profit.

Similarly, telephone intercepts which discovered Stokes arranging to purchase the drug, do not indicate that he intended to use the drug or sell it. He was asked by the AFL to take a urine test on Wednesday, which may or may not vindicate this claim.

Stokes was said by Geelong chief executive Brian Cook to be "shattered and really struggling". He was visited by teammates at his home in Highton, near Geelong, during the morning before leaving with teammate James Kelly for meetings with officials and the club's leadership group. He returned to Highton in the late afternoon before leaving for Melbourne, where he was expected to meet with his management.If Stokes does succeed in having the trafficking charge downgraded or dropped and appears before the Geelong Magistrates Court on March 12 to face a single charge of possession, he will still face a lengthy spell on the sidelines imposed by the reigning premiers and approved first by the AFL.Geelong expects to announce later today what disciplinary action it will take against Stokes, who has been stood down indefinitely.Following a lengthy meeting at Skilled Stadium yesterday between the players' leadership group and Stokes, the penalties recommended by the players were forwarded to chief executive Brian Cook and the football department.The Geelong board will consider the recommendations today before announcing what sanctions it will impose.Evidence presented to the court during his bail hearing on Wednesday afternoon indicated that when the substance of his text messages and calls to alleged drug dealer Matthew Randall were revealed to him, Stokes admitted purchasing the cocaine for $500.Admitting that he purchased it for his visitors meant that he soon became the first AFL footballer to be charged with trafficking drugs.Police said they had no evidence of Stokes using cocaine.

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charged Dewayne Bynum, 24, 4007 Harvey St., Monroe with possession of crack cocaine

charged Dewayne Bynum, 24, 4007 Harvey St., Monroe with possession of crack cocaine with intent to distribute, possession of marijuana, illegal possession of a firearm and three counts of distributing crack cocaine.An arrest affidavit said officers charged Bynum at his home, where they recovered a Hi Point .40-caliber handgun and drugs. The suspect said he was a convicted felon, but officers had not been able to confirm that at the arrest.No bond was set on the possession charge or the weapons charge, and bond was set at $25,000 for each of three warrants on the distributing charge.

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Thomas (T.J.) Gleason, the 34-year-old chef at the Ruddy and Dean North Shore Steak House, and another man, Ralph Fleischmann, 40, arrested

Thomas (T.J.) Gleason, the 34-year-old chef at the Ruddy and Dean North Shore Steak House, and another man, Ralph Fleischmann, 40, have both been arrested on felony drug dealing charges, accused of selling $100 worth of cocaine at the bar.
The restaurant, which sits just a block away from both the state Supreme Court building house and the NYPD 120th Precinct stationhouse in St. George, has long been a haunt for attorneys and police officers who work in the area.
As authorities tell it, an undercover police officer walked in on the night of Jan. 14 and spoke with Gleason, telling him, “I need $100 of powder.” Gleason’s response, according to court papers, was “I’m out. I’ll make a call. Wait by the bar and I’ll let you know when he’s here.” Gleason then made a call to someone named “Pookie,” according to a law enforcement source, and about an hour and a half later, Fleischmann showed up. The officer gave Gleason $100, and after a conversation, “both defendants engaged in a transaction underneath the bar ledge,” according to court papers. After that, Gleason handed the officer a Ziploc bag and a plastic twist of cocaine, authorities allege.Authorities say Fleischmann was the restaurant’s manager, but both the bar’s owner, Danny Mills, and the current manager, Kim Hogan, said that’s simply not true.
“Ralph never worked here,” she said. “Ralph has nothing to do with this bar.”
Mills called the drug bust an “isolated incident,” sparked by a 311 complaint, and said the arrests shouldn’t reflect badly on his business or reputation.
“We are a clean place,” Mills said. Gleason, he said, made a bad decision by calling someone up to get drugs at the request of a stranger. “He made a silly decision, helping a guy he didn’t know. And there are consequences.... he’s fired,” Mills said. “He made that choice, and for that he lost his job.” Mills also took issue with a statement in the report that Fleischmann and Gleason were arrested inside the bar. The two men, he said, were arrested outside of the building. Both Gleason, of Cooper Terrace in New Springville, and Fleischmann, of the 100 block of Townsend Avenue in Clifton, face charges of third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance, as well as third-, fifth- and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, said William J. Smith, a spokesman for District Attorney Daniel Donovan. They’ve since been released on $1,500 bail, pending return appearances to Stapleton Criminal Court on March 11. Neither could be reached for comment today.

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Suresh Surendranath Nair is accused of killing both women at his Elizabeth Bay apartment last year.

Suresh Surendranath Nair is accused of killing both women at his Elizabeth Bay apartment last year.It is alleged that in November the 41-year-old murdered Brazilian student Suellen Domingues Zaupa, who died when she collapsed with breathing problems after taking cocaine.He is also charged with the manslaughter of Victora McIntyre, who also overdosed on cocaine at his home in February.The surgeon had been working at Nepean hospital and was suspended from practise last year.
He did not apply for bail and his case will return to court later this month

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Caro Quintero's Sonora cartel was tied to the 1985 torture and killing of an undercover Drug Enforcement Administration agent


Caro Quintero's Sonora cartel was tied to the 1985 torture and killing of an undercover Drug Enforcement Administration agent, Enrique "Kiki" Camarena Salazar. Caro Quintero's brother, Rafael Caro Quintero, is in prison in Mexico for the slaying, but authorities never directly linked Miguel Angel to the crime.
A. James Kolar, then the sergeant in charge of the Boulder narcotics unit, said police were called to the hotel after a maid found the money."He apparently went off and left the money in the room," Kolar recalled after Thursday's sentencing. "We were checking it out, and he came back to get it."Police didn't immediately arrest the man, but they followed him to a grocery store parking lot where they discovered an RV packed with nearly a half ton of marijuana. Police then questioned the suspect, who said he was working for the cartel.Following that trail, the investigation led to several suspects in Colorado and in Arizona, Kolar said.
"We had no idea that Mr. Quintero was involved," said Kolar, now the police chief in Telluride, a ski resort town in southwestern Colorado. "It wasn't until we got indictments from federal agents that witnesses started providing information that led to Quintero."Enrique Camarena Salazar was working for the DEA out of Guadalajara, Mexico, when he was kidnapped on Feb. 7, 1985, by five armed men who threw him into a car and sped away. He was tortured and beaten to death. The 37-year-old agent left behind a wife and three children.Caro Quintero's brother was convicted in Camarena's slaying. After his brother's arrest, federal authorities say Caro Quintero took over the operation that smuggled thousands of tons of marijuana and cocaine into the U.S. in the 1980s.Prosecutors said under Caro Quintero's direction, the cartel exported two to four tons of marijuana a month to Colorado between 1985 and 1988. It was distributed throughout the United States by aircraft and vehicle.Caro Quintero was indicted in Colorado in 1990 on charges that included smuggling marijuana in half-ton amounts in 1987. Prosecutors say he also conspired with two other people to import thousands of pounds of marijuana into Arizona and was recorded on the phone trying to sell marijuana to an undercover drug agent.
"The thing about this case is it demonstrates that it's not a matter of whether we're going to get these guys, it's a matter of when," said Jeffrey Sweetin, Denver DEA special agent in charge.Caro Quintero was arrested in December 2001 in Los Mochis, Mexico, and served a drug sentence in that country. He was extradited to the U.S. last February.
Camarena's slaying was commemorated each year by students in Calexico, Calif., where he attended high school. Students wore red ribbons in the agent's memory. The remembrance expanded and was made national by Congress in 1988 as Red Ribbon Week, during which drug and violence prevention campaigns are held in schools each October.
Camarena was a native of Mexicali, Mexico. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and the Calexico and El Centro, Calif., police departments before joining the DEA.

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