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Top Ten Cities for arresting Americans


The top 10 cities where Americans were arrested and the number taken into custody:
1. Tijuana: 520
2. Guadalajara: 416
3. Nuevo Laredo: 359
4. London: 274
5. Mexico City: 208
6. Toronto: 183
7. Nassau, Bahamas: 108
8. Mérida, Mexico: 99
9. Nogales, Mexico: 96
10. Hong Kong: 90

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

Arrests WorldWide (Drug Enforcement)

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2,500 citizens are arrested abroad. One third of the arrests are on drug-related charges. Many of those arrested assumed as U.S. citizens that they could not be arrested. From Asia to Africa, Europe to South America, citizens are finding out the hard way that drug possession or trafficking equals jail in foreign countries.
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Over 3000 drug related posts search here

Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Drug Enforcement automatically monitors news articles and blog posts tracking breaking news of arrests and drug incidents as they happen worldwide .These inter-active News Reports are followed as they develop. Giving you the chance to comment on breaking stories as they happen. Drug Enforcement alerts you to topics that are frequently linked to and commented upon in the world press. Someone is arrested every 20 seconds for a drug related offense !Readers are solely responsible for the content of the comments they post here. Comments are subject to the Blogspots terms and conditions of use and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or approval of the Drug Enforcement site. Readers whose comments violate the terms of use may have their comments removed or all of their content blocked from viewing by other users without notification.

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Wednesday, October 31

Austrian online bomb threat

Authorities in Quebec, Canada have arrested an alleged terrorist linked to an Austrian online bomb threat, the Blotter on ABCNews.com has learned.

Authorities say the Canadian arrest was carried out in conjunction with the arrests of three other suspects in Austria yesterday.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) made the arrest Wednesday at the suspect's home in Trois Rivieres, Quebec, in a joint operation with Austrian authorities, law enforcement officials said Thursday.

Read more...

Police believe the two UK based men are members of an international hacking group calling themselves the "THr34t-Krew".

Two UK men were arrested this morning following police raids in the UK and US aimed at dismantling an international hacker group believed to have created a virulent computer worm.

Officers from the Durham Constabulary arrested a 19 year-old electrician and a 21 year-old unemployed man after seizing evidence related to computer and drugs offences during a raid on two addresses in County Durham this morning.

The pair are being interviewed today by officers of the UK's National Hi-Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU).

Police believe the two UK based men are members of an international hacking group calling themselves the "THr34t-Krew".

The group has created an Internet worm, called the TK worm, which infected approximately 18,000 computers around the world, according to a statement by the NHTCU.

Read more...

Actor Martin Sheen: "I've Been Arrested 65 Times"

The San Francisco Chronicle has reported that Martin Sheen claims that he has been arrested 65 times in the past 20 years. The most recent arrest was a police citation this year for trespassing on a Nevada nuclear test site. Sheen reportedly told the British magazine Empire that he fondly remembers his first arrest, also in protest of nuclear initiatives. However, Sheen was also quick to add that he has never been sentenced to more than "a little bit" of jail time. Sheen played the role of U.S. President on the television show "The West Wing."

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Classic Car Broker Peter Brotman Sentenced to Prison after Bamboozling Nicolas Cage Out of $300k

Classic Car Broker Peter Brotman Sentenced to Prison after Bamboozling Nicolas Cage Out of $300k
Peter Brotman, a classic-car broker who reportedly conned actor Nicolas Cage and other clients out of large sums of money was sentenced to five years in prison and ordered to pay $1.8 million in restitution. Brotman reportedly sold classic cars on consignment for the rich and famous, then kept the money. His attorney blamed "cash flow problems" as the reason that Brotman, 47, did not send proceeds from the sale of a Rolls Royce, an Aston Martin, three Ferraris, a Cobra and a Jaguar to the clients who owned the cars. Actor Nicholas Cage reportedly lost $300,000 when Brotman failed to pay him the full amount of car sales in 2004.

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Actor Tom Sizemore from "Saving Private Ryan" Arrested for Drugs

Actor Tom Sizemore was arrested for possession of methamphetamine outside a hotel in Bakersfield, California, after an associate, Jason Salcido, started an argument while attempting to check into the hotel. Police then searched Sizemore's car and found two bags of suspected methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia. Sizemore was arrested and kept at Kern County Jail. He was convicted of methamphetamine possession in 2004 and was still on probation from those charges. Police said Sizemore appeared to be under the influence of drugs at the time of the arrest. If convicted, Sizemore could face a significant jail term.

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judge praised actor Mel Gibson

A California judge praised actor Mel Gibson for successfully undergoing a rehab program after he made world headlines for drunken, racist, sexist rants against police in Malibu, California when he was arrested for a DUI. At a hearing in Malibu to assess his progress, Judge Lawrence Mira said he was "impressed" with Gibson's commitment to recovery, though Gibson himself was not present at the hearing. Although Gibson apologized several times for his outbursts

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Handcuffing Herself to Hugh Grant

Woman Prankster Arrested for Handcuffing Herself to Hugh Grant
The star of a Dutch television show was arrested for handcuffing herself to actor Hugh Grant while he walked down the red carpet at the Amsterdam premiere of his latest movie, "Music and Lyrics." Cielke Sijben reportedly ran up to Grant and slipped a handcuff on his left wrist. Grant had to reportedly wait ten minutes for firefighters to free him from the woman. According to a report in the New York Daily News, after the woman told Grant she didn't have a key, he reportedly told her, "I am trying to be with my fans and you are pissing me off."

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background checks on more than 1000 foreigners

THAI authorities are conducting background checks on more than 1000 foreigners working in Thailand after a spate of arrests for alleged child sex abuse, a senior officer said today.

Colonel Apichat Suriboonya, of Thailand's Interpol office, said police had contacted the home countries of many of the targeted foreigners, most of whom are teachers.

"We are now scrutinising more than 1000 foreign teachers working in Thailand," he told AFP.

"Before, educational institutions would only look at their academic qualifications, but that is not enough."

Colonel Apichat did not say how police had chosen the foreigners in question.

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Thursday, October 4

Richard Monteith, 50, from Whitley Bay, is to plead guilty to murder.

Richard Monteith, 50, from Whitley Bay, is to plead guilty to murder.

Spanish police have charged Monteith and his wife Anne-Marie, with the murder of 63-year-old Diana Dyson, from Sheffield.

But according to Stephen Jakobi, a director of Fair Trials Abroad, Monteith has confessed to the contract killing of Mrs Dyson in the Spanish resort of Torremolinos in March 2002.


Richard Monteith is being held in Spain

Mr Jakobi said Monteith told his Spanish lawyer he had been offered up to £30,000 to carry out the killing.

He said the charity would still act for Monteith's 48-year-old wife as long as she maintained her innocence.

Mr Jakobi said: "Some admissions have been made. The Spanish lawyer said that developments in DNA testing had led to a confession.

"She said what he said was that it was a contract killing and that he was offered a large sum of money to do it."

Mr Jakobi confirmed the amount in question was between 25,000 and 50,000 euros (£16,600 - £33,200).

Tests had shown the DNA of hair found under the victim's fingernails was Mr Monteith's.

'Serious crime'

He is now expected to plead guilty at the forthcoming trial, expected to take place in "a month or two".

But Mr Jakobi said he was worried about the possibility of Mrs Monteith receiving a fair hearing.

He added: "The concern is that there is no money to pay for the legal defence of Mrs Monteith, who still declares her innocence and whose husband still declares her innocence.

"The Spanish legal system is useless for serious crime. Only the young and inexperienced take legal aid cases. The rates are so rotten that serious lawyers don't do it.

"On a murder charge, particularly one where her husband has pleaded guilty, you need a good lawyer."

The couple have been held in prison in Malaga since being charged after Mrs Dyson's body was found in her apartment in Torremolinos on 10 March, 2002.

Detectives believed she was dead for four or five days before she was found.

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Tuesday, October 2

Human Rights organisations in Egypt have stated that it is likely that the men will receive a minimum sentence of 25 years hard labour.

Majid Nawz, Ian Nesbitt and Rezha Pankhust, all British citizens are facing a military court on 20th October 2002.
Human Rights organisations in Egypt have stated that it is likely that the men will receive a minimum sentence of 25 years hard labour.
Majid Nawaz was on a compulsory year abroad as part of his degree programme. He was sent to Egypt as a SOAS student and enrolled at a course at Alexandria university. Therefore it is his right to have access to support by both SOAS and his host institution in Egypt.

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enduring 20 nights on the cold concrete floor of one of South Africa’s most notorious prisons.

Derek Bond, 72, an unassuming wine enthusiast from Bristol, walked free from Durban Central Police Station after enduring 20 nights on the cold concrete floor of one of South Africa’s most notorious prisons.

The story behind Mr Bond’s arrest for international fraud and subsequent release following a misguided FBI investigation would not look out of place in a Hollywood film script.

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Prague Piss Up Tours

20 March 2007
Ewan said:
"The whole stag experience was fantastic and everyone had a great time and they all appreciated the time Peter put into the weekend and all his help and advice"

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Countries with a hardline stance on drugs

Death penalty
Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand.
Heavy prison sentences
Cyprus: zero tolerance policy towards drugs and possession will usually lead to a hefty fine or even life imprisonment
Greece: possession of even small quantities of drugs can lead to lengthy and even life imprisonment
South East Asia: sentences of 40 to 50 years are not uncommon
Harsh sentences
India: 10 years for smoking cannabis
Italy: Up to 20 years imprisonment
Jamaica: Drug offences result in mandatory prison sentences and large fines. Possession of even small quantities can lead to imprisonment
Morocco: Maximum of 10 years imprisonment plus a fine.
Spain: Sentences for carrying can be up to 12 years
Tunisia: Possession of even a small amount of drugs could cost you a term in prison, while more serious charges may even result in 20 years imprisonment plus a fine
Turkey: Up to 20 years imprisonment
Venezuela: Drug carriers face minimum 10-year prison sentences in harsh conditions

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Many countries outside the UK refuse to grant bail before trial and often detain people in solitary confinement

Being caught by UK customs with a small amount of class C drugs, for personal use only, may just get you a financial penalty rather than a court case, however you will get a customs record, and if caught again you will get a criminal prosecution. If someone you are travelling with is caught with drugs, you are likely to be searched and questioned too. If you are caught with drugs on you as well, no matter how small the amount, you will both get the same legal penalties.
You will still get a criminal record in the UK if caught with drugs abroad, which may effect future employment. This may also mean that you are refused a visa for the some countries including the USA.
If you've been caught with drugs abroad, you're unlikely to ever be allowed to visit the country again.
If you get injured or ill as a result of drugs, your holiday insurance may be invalidated and your tour operator can refuse to fly you home.

Read more...

Brits have been arrested for purchasing souvenirs that were, or looked like, antiques

Brits have been arrested for purchasing souvenirs that were, or looked like, antiques and which local customs authorities believed were national treasures. This is especially true in Turkey, Egypt and Mexico

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arrested for possessing prescription drugs

A number of travellers have been arrested for possessing prescription drugs, particularly tranquilizers and amphetamines, that they purchased legally in certain Asian countries and then brought to some countries in the Middle East where they are illegal.

Others have been arrested for purchasing prescription drugs abroad in quantities that local authorities suspected were for commercial use.

Read more...

victimization of motorists has been refined to an art

In many places frequented by tourists, including areas of southern Europe, victimization of motorists has been refined to an art. Where it is a problem, British embassies are aware of it and consular officers try to work with local authorities to warn the public about the dangers.

Carjackers and thieves operate at petrol stations, car parks, in city traffic and along the highway. Be suspicious of anyone who hails you or tries to get your attention when you are in or near your car. In some urban areas, thieves don't waste time on ploys, they simply smash car windows at traffic lights, grab your valuables or your car and get away.

In cities around the world, "defensive driving" has come to mean more than avoiding auto accidents; it means keeping an eye out for potentially criminal pedestrians, cyclists and scooter riders.

Read more...

India, Thailand and Australia also appear in the top ten countries where Briton’s required consular assistance

The Czech Republic features as one of the countries where most consular assistance is required with a disproportionate number of lost passports, arrests and hospitalisations. This is likely to be due to the massive influx of hen and stag parties to Prague.

India, Thailand and Australia also appear in the top ten countries where Briton’s required consular assistance - perhaps suggesting although Brits are getting more adventurous with their travels they are not doing enough preparation before they go. The high figures in India might well be a result of many British Asians visiting family members and forgoing usual travel preparations such as vaccinations or travel insurance.

Read more...

Fair Trials Abroad may be called on to help with the actual investigation of a crime

Fair Trials Abroad may be called on to help with the actual investigation of a crime, in some cases even gathering evidence and statements.

"When you suffer a miscarriage of justice and you have been arrested for something you did not do, you will have a sense of rage, as will your relatives, and that may transcend you being reasonable," Mr Jakobi said.

"Quite obviously your first reaction will be to wonder where the Foreign Office is and ask why they are not securing your release. That is when we have to work together."

Read more...

Henry Stableford has been freed.

The Italian authorities exceeded the 30 day limit to present necessary papers from Morroco as these had not been forthcoming.

However, the effort will continue as the arrest warrants are still active. We will be building a campaign and amending this website to reflect this over the coming days.

Read more...

SECOND INNOCENT BRITISH MAN ARRESTED ABROAD ON GROUNDLESS CHARGES FACES EXTRADITION TO MOROCCO

Another innocent British man has been arrested abroad in connection with the delivery of a boat to Morocco in 1997. Henry Stableford, a member of the ill-fated UK crew of Duanas has just been arrested in Fano Italy, on an international arrest warrant and now faces extradition to Morocco.

Almost one year ago crewmember John Packwood was released from a Moroccan prison after His Majesty the King of Morocco granted his freedom before his trial on the basis that there was no case to answer. A second innocent crewmember is now confronted by the same nightmare ordeal.

Unbelievably, Byranston educated Henry Stableford 31, a keen sailor who was a 21 year old deck hand on the Duanas at the time, now faces extradition to Morocco on the same groundless charges. He was working in Fano, on the Adriatic coast, as a subcontracted boat builder for Wally Yachts. He is currently in Pesaro prison.

The Duanas was formerly HMS Cygnet, a Royal Navy patrol vessel once commanded by Tim Lawrence, the Princess Royal’s husband, and sold by HMG through a broker to the new owners. Like Mr Packwood, Henry responded to the advertisement to deliver the boat from Southampton in 1997. Upon arrival in Agadir, and after the boat being thoroughly searched and cleared by Moroccan customs, the hapless UK crew returned home.

Two months later and unbeknown to the crew and sellers of the boat, the Duanas was used by a Columbian drug cartel with a Columbian crew to smuggle cocaine. They were caught off the Moroccan coast. No suggestion was ever made or evidence tendered to suggest the UK crew or the sellers of the boat knew that the owner was part of a cartel, or that they had any nexus whatsoever to the drugs later seized from the vessel. The UK crews’ only crime therefore, was that of answering an advert on a reputable crew agency website (Crewseekers) to deliver a boat from A to B.

Over seven years later in October 2004, totally unaware that a Moroccan court had issued an international arrest warrant for the UK crew, John Packwood went on holiday to Spain. Thereupon he was arrested and spent over a year fighting extradition from a Madrid prison (a process that took no notice of evidence and was merely procedural). Inevitably, he was extradited to Morocco.

The injustice of John’s case attracted the support of many celebrities and well known public figures, including George Clooney, Hugh Grant, Mark Knofler, Andrew Turner MP and numerous MEPS, who campaigned for his release with his lawyers. The proof of innocence and groundswell of support led to the welcomed intervention of the King of Morocco, before Mr Packwood’s trial, who granted his freedom based on there being no case to answer. Thankfully, after a nightmare ordeal, Mr Packwood was back home for Christmas 2005 with his family.

Read more...

Human rights is a very flexible concept... It depends how hypocritical you want to be on a particular day

A former CIA official has confirmed suspicions that dozens of terror suspects have been flown to jails in Middle Eastern countries where torture is routinely practised, and without reference to courts of law.
Michael Scheuer, who once headed the hunt for Osama Bin Laden and left the CIA last November after a 22-year career, said the practice, known as "extraordinary rendition", was seen by the US as a key tactic in its war on terror.

"The bottom line is getting anyone off the streets who is involved in acts of terrorism is a worthwhile activity," he told the BBC's File On 4 programme.


Mike Scheuer,
former CIA agent
Mr Scheuer said the operation was authorised at the highest levels of the CIA and the White House and was approved by their lawyers.


"The practice of capturing people and taking them to second or third countries arose because the Executive assigned the job of dismantling terrorist cells to the CIA.

"When the agency came back and said 'Where do you want to take them?' the message was 'That's your job'."

He added: "The idea that this is a rogue operation that someone has dreamt up is just absurd. I personally have no problem with doing any operation as long as it's justified legal by my superiors."

Read more...

2,421 British nationals detained overseas

As at 30 September 2006, British consular officials were aware of 2,421 British nationals detained overseas. We provide consular assistance to any British national, regardless of country of residence. Additionally collecting data on nation of residence would not be possible because laws covering permanent residence

Read more...

Seven British nationals were arrested in the early hours of this morning, between 2am and 4am, outside a nightclub near the stadium after being involv

The supporters were detained following a fracas outside a nightclub in the capital city of Skopje, the Foreign Office said.
All have since been released without charge following the incident near the Skopje City Stadium and will be free to watch the tie against Rabotnicki.
A Foreign Office spokesman said: "Seven British nationals were arrested in the early hours of this morning, between 2am and 4am, outside a nightclub near the stadium after being involved in a fight.
"All seven were taken to the local police station, questioned and released without charge."

Read more...

Monday, October 1

Sanctions were made by US and EU but made no difference for more than a decade.

Throughout the past 15 years or so, UN sent representatives to solve national reconciliation in Myanmar. But all the efforts these representatives made were in vain since the Burmese dictator is not willing to move a step towards national reconciliation. Sanctions were made by US and EU but made no difference for more than a decade.

The number of political prisoners is around 1400 and still increasing rapidly these days. National leader Daw Aung San Su Kyi was under house arrest since 2003. Some of elected representatives of 1990 election were in jail or exile. They restrict all the activities of NLD party and keep arresting party members. And, according to confirmed news, five monks died after yesterday's clashes.

So, what will be next after this UN Security Council meeting? We, the people of Burma, need direct actions from UN. A possibility could be deploying UN peace keeping troops and help establishing interim government.

Read more...

Rangoon Burma

Both the Sydney Morning Herald and the Australian are carrying disturbing photos and stories about what’s happening in Burma. The military are rounding up Buddhist monks in trucks and taking them away so they can’t come to the city to protest. They killed a Japanese photographer who was capturing the unrest on film, and apparently went searching for more foreign journalists in a nearby city hotel. The Australian reports that 11 people at least have been killed and that this tactic of letting people protest for a few days and then cracking down is to enable to military junta to identify those who are protesting.

Read more...
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Disclaimer: The statements and articles listed here, and any opinions, are those of the writers alone, and neither are opinions of nor reflect the views of this Blog. Aggregated content created by others is the sole responsibility of the writers and its accuracy and completeness are not endorsed or guaranteed. This goes for all those links, too: Blogs have no control over the information you access via such links, does not endorse that information, cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information provided or any analysis based thereon, and shall not be responsible for it or for the consequences of your use of that information.

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